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Speakers

Keynote Speakers

  • Dr. Avram Bar-Cohen

    Raytheon – Space and Airborne Systems
    USA

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  • Prof. Richard D. Gitlin

    University of South Florida
    USA

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  • Prof. Yoram Palti

    NovoCure
    Israel

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  • Prof. Theodore (Ted) S. Rappaport

    NYU-Tandon
    USA

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  • Dr. Avraham Suhami

    Elscint Tomography
    Israel

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Dr. Avram Bar-Cohen

Principal Engineering FellowRaytheon – Space and Airborne Systems
USA

Bio:

Dr. Avram Bar-Cohen is an internationally recognized leader in thermal management of microelectronics, the IEEE Electronic Packaging Society President for 2018-2019, and Life Fellow of IEEE, as well as Honorary Member of ASME. He currently serves as a Principal Engineering Fellow at Raytheon Corporation – Space and Airborne Systems, focusing on directed energy systems, hypersonic vehicles, diamond substrates, and advanced heterogeneous integration. He is a past recipient of the IEEE Electronic Packaging Field Award (2014) and the Luikov Medal from the International Heat and Mass Center in Turkey (2008). He edits the WSPC’s book series on Emerging Technologies and is the Editor-in-Chief for the WSPC Encyclopedia of Thermal Packaging. 

Title:

Wireless Power Beaming - the Future is Now

Abstract:

Although Nikola Tesla conceived of wireless power transmission more than 100 years ago, applications of this mode of directed energy have lagged behind the use of focused RF beams for telecommunications and RADAR. W.C. “Bill” Brown’s (Raytheon) invention of the rectifying antenna (’65) and demonstration of 34 kW in beamed power (’75) established the feasibility of wireless power beaming, but many challenges remain in extending the range, power level, operational frequencies, and rectenna technologies to provide wireless delivery of continuous power, at levels of MW to GW, over extended periods. Such wireless power beaming(WPB) can play a critical role in delivering renewable power from uninhabited regions to the earth’s population centers, in extending the electrification of manned and unmanned airborne, ground, and naval vehicles with power delivered from remotely-located transmitters, and may well be a key enabling technology for powering space platforms, space exploration vehicles, and future space colonies, as well as delivering solar power from space to the power grid on earth and to remote off-grid locations.

This Keynote presentation will open with a review of Tesla’s and Brown’s pioneering work and continue with the history of WPB-based Solar Power Satellite efforts, as well as other potential terrestrial and space applications. Attention will then turn to the key components of a notional WPB system – operating in RF, mmW, or laser frequencies - and the advances required to mature WPB as a pivotal application of Directed Energy technology.

Prof. Richard D. Gitlin

Professor of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of South Florida
USA

Bio:

Richard D. Gitlin is a State of Florida 21st Century World Class Scholar, Distinguished University Professor, and the Agere Systems Chaired Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of South Florida. He has 50 years of leadership in the communications industry and in academia and he has a record of significant research contributions that have been sustained and prolific over several decades.

Dr. Gitlin is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a Fellow of the IEEE, a Bell Laboratories Fellow, a Charter Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), and a member of the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame (2017). He is also a co-recipient of the 2005 Thomas Alva Edison Patent Award and the IEEE S.O. Rice prize (1995), co-authored a communications text, published more than 170 papers, including 3 prize-winning papers, and holds 65 patents.

After receiving his doctorate at Columbia University in 1969, he joined Bell Laboratories, where he worked for 32-years performing and leading pioneering research and development in digital communications, broadband networking, and wireless systems including: co-invention of DSL (Digital Subscriber Line), multicode CDMA (3/4G wireless), and pioneering the use of smart antennas (“MIMO”) for wireless systems At his retirement, Dr. Gitlin was Senior VP for Communications and Networking Research at Bell Labs, a multi-national research organization with over 500 professionals. After retiring from Lucent, he was visiting professor of Electrical Engineering at Columbia University, and later he was Chief Technology Officer of Hammerhead Systems, a venture funded networking company in Silicon Valley. He joined USF in 2008 where his research is on wireless cyberphysical systems that advance minimally invasive surgery and cardiology and on addressing fundamental technical challenges in 5G/6G wireless systems.

Title:

Wireless Century Perspective: 5G/IoT (Internet of Things) and a Vision for 6G/IoE (Internet of Everything)

Abstract:

This presentation provides a perspective on the emerging Wireless Century driven by the introduction of  5G/IoT networks and expectations for 6G /IoE wireless networking.

It is expected that the fifth generation (5G) of mobile communications will impact our life more than any previous wireless technology by enabling a seamlessly connected society that brings together people, data, and “things” via a myriad of new applications and technologies. This presentation will focus on several research challenges and foundation technologies needed to meet the ambitious 5G/IoT application requirements for broadband networking, low-latency applications [e.g., autonomous vehicles] technologies, and Internet of Things (IoT) scenarios such as Machine-to-Machine (M2M) networking.  Technology emphasis will be on the central role of Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) in optimizing the latency and throughput of cell-less and edge-based (“Fog”) network architectures, synchronization of mmWave networks, novel MAC and NOMA [non-orthogonal multiple access] signal processing for increased throughput in M2M communications, and enabling near-instant recovery from link or nodal failures.

Several contemplated revolutionary 6G/IoE applications will be briefly discussed including self-sustaining networks, 3-D systems (ground and aerial users), smart cities, extended reality, cyber-physical networking of wearable and in vivo bio-medical devices, wireless brain-computer interactions, and connected autonomous systems (e.g., drones, robots). Selected foundation technologies envisioned to realize these application will also be presented including: edge AI, large intelligent surfaces, and 3D networking.

Prof. Yoram Palti

FounderNovoCure
Israel

Bio:

Yoram Palti, MD, PhD, is a professor emeritus of Physiology & Biophysics & Biomedical Engineering at the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology. Palti holds an M.Sc. and MD degrees from the Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, and a Ph.D. in Biophysics from the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.

Palti served as Assoc. Prof. of Physiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, 1969 – 1971, Professor of Physiology & Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 1976 – 2005, and Director, Rappaport Institute for Research in the Medical Sciences, Technion, 1982 – 1993.

In 2000 Palti founded Novocure Ltd, served as its director till 2018 and is serving as its Chief Technology Officer since the company was founded. Within this framework Palti is the inventor and developer of the novel cancer treatment modality - Tumor Treating Fields, TTFields. In 2011 the FDA approved TTFields as treatment for Recurrent brain Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). In Oct 2015 the FDA approved TTFields as treatment for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma and in July 2019, for lung Mesothelioma. Currently Novocure is carrying out advanced clinical trials brain metastases, non-small cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer and liver cancer.

Palti is the author of numerous scientific papers and issued patents in the medical as well as other fields that served as a basis for unique start-ups.

Title:

Tumor Treating Fields, TTFields, from Theory to Clinical Practice

Abstract:

Electric fields of low frequency and amplitude are generated by both excitable tissues (nerve, muscle, heart, brain) and a large variety of devices that are in everyday use. Intermediate frequency (10K – 1MHz) and high frequency (into the GHZ range) fields are present all around us and, at relatively low power levels that have no thermal effects, are generally considered not to have any meaningful biological effects, although there is a debate regarding this point for the GigaHz range.

Analysis of electric field distribution in living tissues revealed that in some specific cases, intermediate-frequency electric fields may have a significant biological effect. The field effect is primarily due to the fact that cancer cells proliferate frequently and, as they undergo division, they assume an hourglass shape that results in a non-uniform strong intracellular field.  The alternating intracellular electric field affects charged and polar or polarizable structures, resulting in dielectrophoresis, i.e. the exertion of non-alternating electric forces on polarizable molecules and structures, including tubulin that plays a major role in cell division. All such structures are forced to migrate towards the narrow neck between the daughter cells and destroy cell structure and interrupt division. On this basis Novocure was founded about 20 years ago with the aim to utilize the unique specific effect of intermediate-frequency alternating electric fields on dividing cancer cells and provide a new cancer treatment modality.

After intensive lab work and clinical trials, Tumor Treating fields, TTFields, of 1-3V/cm, at 100-200KHz range, were shown to specifically and effectively destroy cancer cells. TTFields were FDA approved for treatment of the most prevalent brain cancer: glioblastoma multiforme and malignant pleural (lung) mesothelioma. Novocure has ongoing TTFields clinical trials in: brain metastases, non-small cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer and liver cancer.

Prof. Theodore (Ted) S. Rappaport

Professor of Electrical EngineeringNYU-Tandon
USA

Bio:

Theodore (Ted) S. Rappaport is the David Lee/Ernst Weber Professor of Electrical Engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering (NYU-Tandon) and is a professor of computer science at New York University's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. He is also a professor of radiology at the NYU School of Medicine.

Rappaport is the founding director of NYU WIRELESS, the world's first academic research center to combine engineering, computer science, and medicine. Earlier, he founded two of the world's largest academic wireless research centers: The Wireless Networking and Communications Group (WNCG) at the University of Texas at Austin in 2002, and the Mobile and Portable Radio Research Group (MPRG), now known as Wireless@ at Virginia Tech, in 1990.

Rappaport is a pioneer in radio wave propagation for cellular and personal communications, wireless communication system design, and broadband wireless communications circuits and systems at millimeter wave frequencies. His research has influenced many international wireless-standards bodies, and he and his students invented the technology of site-specific radio frequency (RF) channel modeling and design for wireless network deployment - a technology now used routinely throughout wireless communications.

Rappaport has served on the Technological Advisory Council of the Federal Communications Commission, assisted the governor and CIO of Virginia in formulating rural broadband initiatives for Internet access, and conducted research for NSF, Department of Defense, and dozens of global telecommunications companies. He has over 100 U.S. or international patents issued or pending and has authored, co-authored, and co-edited 18 books, including the world's best-selling books on wireless communications, millimeter wave communications, and smart antennas.

In 1989, he founded TSR Technologies, Inc., a cellular radio/PCS software radio manufacturer that he sold in 1993 to Allen Telecom which later became CommScope, Inc. (taken private in 2011 by Carlyle Group and now owned by Keysight). In 1995, he founded Wireless Valley Communications, Inc., a pioneering creator of site-specific radio propagation software for wireless network design and management that he sold in 2005 to Motorola.

Rappaport received BS, MS, and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from Purdue University, and is a Distinguished Engineering Alumnus of his alma mater.

Dr. Rappaport can be reached by contacting NYU WIRELESS Administrator Pat Donohue at pat.donohue@nyu.edu, or his assistant Leslie Cerve at cerve@cs.nyu.edu.

Title:

Wireless Beyond 100 GHz: Opportunities and Challenges for 6G and Beyond

Abstract:

With the rollout of 5G millimeter wave mobile networks commencing around the globe, engineers and consumers are just now learning the benefits and pitfalls of massively broadband wireless connectivity. This talk demonstrates how today's early experiences are laying the foundations for revolutionary new products and services that will evolve over the next decade, and which will eventually be a part of 6G networks and beyond.

Dr. Avraham Suhami

Founder & ChairmanElscint Tomography
Israel

Bio:

Title:

Velocity Tomography Imaging and Tumor Treatment Planning

Abstract:

Velocity Tomography basically follows from the Maxwell equations and the theory of Relativity, where it can be shown that the phase Velocity of an Electromagnetic wave V propagating in the human body, is given at high GHz frequencies, where the permittivity εr is much larger than the conductivity (σ), by ~ C0/(εr)1/2 where C0 is the light velocity. For example as the permittivity of a malignant tumor at 3 GHz is ~60 the “inverse velocity” of an RF beam traversing a malignant tissue, is 25psec/mm.

Consequently what Velocity Tomography says is that the nature of a body tissue, whether normal, benign or malignant can be quantified by measuring “Traversal Time”  as “Time” can be measured with extremely high accuracies.

We have clinically shown in cooperation with the Rambam Medical Center that:

NORMAL TISSUE

7+ 4 psec/mm

BENIGN TISSUE

14+3 psec/mm

MALIGNANT TISSUE

27+6 psec/mm

 

As microwaves have significantly longer depth of penetration than do x-rays, Velocity measurements do not require use of Breast compression for in vivo Imaging, as it is the case with Mammography, digital or not.

As the permittivities of blood (εr~56) and blood vessel walls (εr~20) are much larger than breast tissue (εr~6], Velocity Imaging, may offer a clear view of microvessel morphology, and detection of Angiogenesis, which differentiate malignant from benign findings.

In context of the assignment of the Benign or Malignant epithets for a growth/tumor it is important to remember that in Velocity Tomography we are measuring “permittivity”, the amount of net electrical charge of the cells around the traversed route. Malignant and benign tumors and normal tissues have different cell-surface charges, which can assist in the classification between them. Moreover, Malignant tumor are usually inhomogenous and therefore it is important to investigate the scope of the measured permittivity and whether it is constant across or along, a tumor. The utility of the technology in optimization of treatment will also be described.

Invited Speakers

  • Dr. Natalia Antonyuk

    Staal Group B.V.
    Netherlands

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  • Prof. Constantine A. Balanis

    Arizona State University
    USA

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  • Dr. Matteo Bassi

    Infineon Technologies
    Austria

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  • Prof. Andrea Bevilacqua

    University of Padova
    Italy

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  • Dr. Rick S. Blum

    Lehigh University
    USA

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  • Prof. Wolfgang Bösch

    Institute for Microwave and Photonic Engineering Graz University of Technology
    Austria

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  • Dr. Charles F. Campbell

    Qorvo
    USA

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  • Prof. Larry Dunleavy

    University of South Florida
    USA

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  • Prof. Yonina Eldar

    Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Weizmann Institute of Science
    Israel

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  • Prof. Frank Ellinger

    Technische Universität Dresden
    Germany

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  • Prof. Caleb Fulton

    The University of Oklahoma
    USA

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  • Dr. Markus Gardill

    InnoSenT GmbH, R&D Automotive Division / Automotive Business Unit
    Germany

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  • Prof. Roberto D. Graglia

    Politecnico di Torino, DET Department
    Italy

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  • Dr. Erich N. Grossman

    NIST

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  • Prof. Amelie Hagelauer

    University of Bayreuth
    Germany

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  • Prof. Yejun He

    Shenzhen University
    China

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  • Dr. Sherry Hess

    AWR Group
    National Instruments
    USA

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  • Prof. Vadim Issakov

    University of Magdeburg
    Germany

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  • Prof. Yogendra Joshi

    G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering
    Georgia Institute of Technology
    USA

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  • Prof. Ingmar Kallfass

    University of Stuttgart
    Germany

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  • Dr. Allen Katz

    The College of New Jersey (TCNJ)
    USA

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  • Dr. Rudolf Lachner

    Semiconductors and Sensors for Safe Driving
    Germany

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  • Dr. Iñigo Liberal

    Public University of Navarra (UPNA)
    Spain

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  • Prof. Andrea Massa

    ELEDIA Research Center Network

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  • Dr. Kumar Vijay Mishra

    United States Army Research Laboratory
    USA

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  • Dr. Dmitri Mogilevtsev

    National Academy of Sciences
    Belarus

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  • Dr. Ivan Ndip

    Fraunhofer IZM
    Germany

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  • Prof. Alexander I. Nosich

    National Academy of Sciences
    Ukraine

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  • Prof. Giacomo Oliveri

    University of Trento
    Italy

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  • Dr. Mario Pauli

    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
    Germany

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  • Prof. Zoya Popovic

    University of Colorado
    USA

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  • Prof. Sembiam R. Rengarajan

    California State University
    USA

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  • Dr. Vishal Riché

    Industry Department of InnoSent GmbH
    Germany

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  • Prof. Paolo Rocca

    University of Trento
    Italy

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  • Dr. Andrej Rumiantsev

    MPI Corporation
    Taiwan

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  • Prof. Shlomo Shamai

    Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
    Israel

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  • Prof. Jeffrey H. Shapiro

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    USA

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  • Prof. Hjalti H. Sigmarsson

    The University of Oklahoma
    USA

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  • Dr. Mark S. Spector

    Advanced Naval Platforms Division at the Office of Naval Research
    USA

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  • ​Mr. Nino Srour

    US Army Research Laboratory
    USA

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  • Prof. Almudena Suárez

    University of Cantabria
    Spain

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  • Dr. Horst Theuss

    Infineon
    Germany

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  • Prof. Mei Song Tong

    Tongji University
    China

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  • Dr. Piergiorgio L. E. Uslenghi

    University of Illinois at Chicago
    USA

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  • Dr. Jeffrey Walling

    Qualcomm
    USA

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  • Dr. Hua Wang

    Georgia Tech Electronics and Micro-System (GEMS) lab
    USA

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  • Dr. Mark E. Weber

    NOAA OAR National Severe Storms Laboratory Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Studies
    University of Oklahoma
    USA

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  • Mr. Marc K. Weinstein

    Xsensus Intellectual Property LLP
    USA

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Dr. Natalia Antonyuk

Director Radar TechnologiesStaal Group B.V.
Netherlands

Bio:

As the Director Radar Technologies at Staal Group B.V. in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, Natalia Antonyuk (Hoog) is responsible for all aspects of technology and engineering for the radar sensors including design and implementation as well as evaluation and modeling complex systems like microwave sensing engineering, ASIC packaging, radar MMICs, antenna – based sensors which involves characterization of the microwave dielectric constant (permittivity) of natural media and associated linkages to microwave sensing signatures.

With a Ph.D. degree in RF sensing technology from the University of Twente she has (co-) authored scholarly articles, conference papers, and 7 patents. In 2013 her research work at Wetsus - European center of excellence for sustainable water technology was awarded the Marcel Mulder prize.

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Constantine A. Balanis

Regents' Professor of Electrical EngineeringArizona State University
USA

Bio:

Constantine A. Balanis (S'62 - M'68 - SM'74 - F'86 – LF'04) received the BSEE degree from Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, in 1964, the MEE degree from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, in 1966, and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, in l969. From 1964-1970 he was with NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA, and from 1970-1983 he was with the Department of Electrical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV.  Since 1983 he has been with the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, where he is Regents' Professor.  His research interests are in computational electromagnetics, metasurfaces, RCS reduction, low-profile and leaky-wave antennas.  He received in 2004 an Honorary Doctorate from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, the 2017 IEEE Rudolf Henning Distinguished Mentoring Award, the 2014 James R. James, Lifetime Achievement Award, LAPC, Loughborough, UK, the 2012 Distinguished Achievement Award of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, the 2012 Distinguished Achievement Alumnus Award (College of Engineering, The Ohio State University), the 2005 Chen-To Tai Distinguished Educator Award of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, the 2000 IEEE Millennium Award, the 1996 Graduate Mentor Award of Arizona State University, the 1992 Special Professionalism Award of the IEEE Phoenix Section, the 1989 Individual Achievement Award of the IEEE Region 6, and the 1987-1988 Graduate Teaching Excellence Award, School of Engineering, Arizona State University.

            Dr. Balanis is a Life Fellow of the IEEE.  He has served as Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation (1974-1977) and the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (1981-1984); as Editor of the Newsletter for the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (1982-1983); as Second Vice-President (1984) and member of the Administrative Committee (1984-85) of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society; and Distinguished Lecturer (2003-2005), Chair of the Distinguished Lecturer Program (1988-1991), member of the AdCom (1992-95, 1997-1999) and Chair of the Awards and Fellows Committee (2009-2011) all of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society.  He is the author of Antenna Theory: Analysis and Design (Wiley, 2005, 1997, 1982), Advanced Engineering Electromagnetics (Wiley, 2012, 1989) and Introduction to Smart Antennas (Morgan and Claypool, 2007), and editor of Modern Antenna Handbook (Wiley, 2008) and for the Morgan & Claypool Publishers,  series on Antennas and Propagation series, and series on Computational Electromagnetics.

Title:

Circular Metasurfaces for Curvilinear Radiating Elements

Abstract:

The integration of radiating elements with metasurfaces have enhanced the radiation performance of antennas. In this paper, circular metasurfaces are reviewed and analyzed. The placement of curvilinear radiating element in the vicinity of a circular metasurface is investigated and compared to rectangular geometries. A superior performance is observed when circular metasurface ground planes are utilized with curvilinear radiating elements.

Dr. Matteo Bassi

Team LeadInfineon Technologies
Austria

Bio:

Matteo Bassi was born in Padova, Italy, in 1985. He received the B.S., M.S. (Summa cum Laude) and Ph.D. degrees in Electronics Engineering from the University of Padova, Italy, in 2007, 2009 and 2013, respectively. In 2008 and 2009 he won a full scholarship and was an EAP student at the University of California, San Diego. During his Ph.D., he co-developed and realized the first CMOS integrated high-resolution radar transceiver front-end for breast cancer detection. Thanks to this work, he was recipient of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society Graduate Fellowship for Medical Applications 2012.

In 2012 he was a visiting Ph.D. student at the Analog Integrated Circuits Laboratory, University of Pavia, Italy, where he worked on power amplifiers in sub-nanometer technologies and high-speed mm-wave communication systems. In 2013 he joined the same group as a Post-Doc, and in December 2013 he became Assistant Professor at the same university. His main research interests were in the field of RF/mm-waves integrated circuits and high-speed serial interfaces for multi-level signaling.

In 2017, he joined Infineon Technologies AG, Villach, Austria, where he is now leading a team focused on the development of high-performance RF and mm-wave IPs.

Dr. Bassi holds more than 40 IEEE publications, and since 2018 he is serving as a member of the Technical Program Committee of ISSCC, wireless sub-committee.

Title:

High Resolution Radar Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection: Trends and Challenges

Abstract:

With ever increasing of breast cancer, which is unfortunate, the need for diagnosis and monitoring tools, i.e., radiotherapy or chemotherapy, is felt more and more. In addition to the available clinical methods, i.e., MRI, CT scan and Mammography, it is required to develop new tools with inexpensive and portable components to increase the accessibility and reducing the queue time. Radar sensing and imagining is new and emerging technology to be enabled for biomedical applications. Ultra-wideband (UWB) has raised considerable interest due to its high resolution. UWB radar can be realized in different technologies, discrete or integrated. The miniaturization carried of the integrated system allows envisioning an antenna array made of modules in which each compact or planar antenna is directly assembled with the radar transceiver chip. A customized integrated circuit can be tailored to fulfill the requirements, i.e., operational bandwidth, dynamic ranges, etc. In this talk, we investigate the typical; system and circuit-level challenges.

Prof. Andrea Bevilacqua

Associate Professor, Department of Information EngineeringUniversity of Padova
Italy

Bio:

Andrea Bevilacqua (S'02, M'04, SM'14)  received the Laurea and Ph.D. degrees in electronics engineering from  the University of Padova, Padova, Italy, in 2000, and 2004,  respectively. From 2005 to 2015, he was an Assistant Professor with the  Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, where he  is now an Associate Professor. His  current research interests include the design of analog and RF/microwave integrated circuits and the analysis of wireless communication systems, radars, and dcdc converters. He is author or coauthor of more than 90 technical  papers, and he holds 5 patents. 

Dr. Bevilacqua is a member of the ITPC of IEEE ISSCC. He has been  serving in the TPC of IEEE ESSCIRC since 2007, and was TPC Co-Chair of  IEEE ESSCIRC 2014. He was a member of the TPC of IEEE ICUWB from 2008  to 2010. He was an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions of  Circuits and Systems II from 2011 to 2013 and was nominated Best Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions of Circuits and Systems II for 2012 to 2013. He served as a Guest Editor for the special issue of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits dedicated to ESSCIRC 2017.  

Title:

Low-Phase Noise Bipolar VCOs for Integrated 5G Front-ends

Abstract:

The talk will deal with the design of low-phase noise voltage-controlled harmonic oscillators (VCOs) implemented in bipolar technologies. The design challenges related to achieving minimum phase noise for a given set of technology parameters (supply voltage, metal stack, varactor devices, etc.) will be discussed with particular emphasis to attaining low phase noise while using varactor diodes, to the use of magnetic transformers in the resonator, and to the selection of the most appropriate oscillator topology. Effective techniques to tackle such issues will be illustrated. Design examples of VCOs operating in the K-band and suitable for 5G applications will be presented.

Dr. Rick S. Blum

IEEE Fellow, IEEE Signal Processing Society Distinguished Lecturer
Robert W. Wieseman Endowed Professor of Electrical Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept.

Bio:

Rick S. Blum received a B.S.E.E from Penn State in 1984 and an M.S./Ph.D in EE from the University of Pennsylvania in 1987/1991. From 1984 to 1991 he was with GE Aerospace. Since 1991, he has been at Lehigh University. His research interests include signal processing/machine learning for cyber security, smart grid, communications, radar and sensor fusion / processing / networking.  Dr. Blum is a Fellow of the IEEE, an IEEE Signal Processing Society Distinguished Lecturer, an IEEE Third Millennium Medal winner, an ONR Young Investigator, AE for many journals/special issues, a member of Eta Kappa Nu/Sigma Xi, and holds several patents.

Title:

Cyber Attacks on Internet of Things Sensor Systems for Inference

Abstract:

The Internet of Things (IoT) improves pervasive sensing and control capabilities via the aid of modern digitial communication, signal processing and massive deployment of sensors. The employment of low-cost and spatially distributed IoT sensor nodes with limited hardware and battery power, along with the low required latency to avoid unstable control loops, presents severe security challenges.  Attackers can modify the data entering or communicated from the IoT sensors which can have serious impact on any algorithm using this data for inference.  In this talk we describe how to provide tight bounds (with sufficient data) on the performance of the best algorithms trying to estimate a parameter from the attacked data and communications under any assumed statistical model describing how the sensor data depends on the parameter before attack.  The results hold regardless of the estimation algorithm adopted which could employ deep learning, machine learning, statistical signal processing or any other approach.  Example algorithms that achieve performance close to these bounds are illustrated.  Attacks that make the attacked data useless for reducing these bounds are also described.  These attacks provide a guaranteed attack performance in terms of the bounds regardless of the algorithms the estimation system employs.  References are supplied which provide various extensions to all the specific results presented and a brief discussion of applications to IEEE 1588 for clock synchronization is provided.

Prof. Wolfgang Bösch

Head of Institute for Microwave and Photonic Engineering Institute for Microwave and Photonic Engineering Graz University of Technology
Austria

Bio:

In March 2010 Professor Prof. Wolfgang Bösch has joined Graz University of Technology in Austria to establish a new Institute for Microwave and Photonic Engineering. Today the Institute holds five research groups with a scientific staff of 35 and a turnover of €1.2m per year. Prior he has been the CTO of the Advanced Digital Institute in the UK, a not for profit organisation to promote research activities. Earlier he served as the Director of Business and Technology Integration for RFMD UK and for almost 10 years he has been with Filtronic plc as CTO of Filtronic Integrated Products and the Director of the Global Technology Group. Before joining Filtronic, he has held positions at the European Space Agency (ESA) working on amplifier linearization techniques, MPRTeltech in Canada working on MMIC technology projects and the Corporate R&D group of M/A-COM in Boston, USA where he worked on advanced topologies for high efficiency power amplifiers. For four years he was with DaimlerChrysler Aerospace (now Airbus) in Germany working on T/R Modules for airborne radar.  Professor Bösch received his engineering degrees from the Technical University of Vienna and Graz in Austria. He finalised his MBA with distinction at Bradford University School of Management in 2004. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and a Fellow of the IET. He published more than 100 papers and holds 4 patents. He was a Non-Executive Director of Diamond Microwave Devices (DMD) and the Advanced Digital Institute (ADI). He is a Non-Executive Director of VIPER-RF company in the UK and is currently the Dean of the Faculty of Electrical and Information Engineering at Graz University of Technology incorporating fifteen Institutes.

Title:

Abstract:

Dr. Charles F. Campbell

Qorvo
USA

Bio:

Charles F. Campbell received B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees from Iowa State University in 1988, 1991 and 1993 respectively. From 1993 to 1998 he was with Texas Instruments involved with microwave module design and MMIC development. Since 1998 he has been with various divisions of TriQuint Semiconductor where he has held positions of Design Team leader, Design Engineering Director and Design Engineering Fellow. He is currently an Engineering Senior Fellow with the Infrastructure and Defense Products Division of Qorvo. A Fellow of the IEEE, he was general chair for the 2015 Compound Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Symposium, has served on the Editorial Board for IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, the IMS TPRC and was a 2016-2018 IEEE Distinguished Microwave lecturer. He has authored or co-authored over 60 journal and conference papers, and authored an on-line book chapter on MMIC power amplifier design.

Title:

Reconfigurable Power Amplifiers

Abstract:

There are a number of applications requiring power amplifiers to operate in multiple, relatively narrow frequency bands with greatly differing center frequencies. A high level of amplifier performance is required within the narrow operating bands but not outside of these bands. To cover multiple bands with a single amplifier MMIC would require either a wideband power amplifier, switched individual amplifiers or a single amplifier tuned for multiple frequency bands. Wideband amplifier MMICs are available but generally have a lower level of performance when compared to amplifiers tuned for the individual bands and are difficult to scale to higher output power levels. Wideband amplifiers also have rated gain and output power capability outside of the operating bands of interest creating a potentially undesirable situation with regard to out of band emissions, harmonic level and amplifier stability. RF switching between individual amplifiers that have been optimized for each frequency range would require a large amount of semiconductor real estate and suffer reduced performance due to the insertion loss of wideband high power RF switches. Past efforts to develop amplifiers tuned for multiple bands have achieved limited success and the approach is not commonly used.

To address this a high power amplifier circuit architecture has been developed that is electronically reconfigurable for operation in multiple frequency bands, maintains a high level of performance, can be realized in a small die size and scales to higher output power levels. The approach is compatible with modern MMIC process technology and utilizes bias and control voltage levels typical of existing RF switch and amplifier functions. This talk will start with a discussion of the realization of MMIC compatible reconfigurable circuit elements and the associated RF switch and bias circuits. A design methodology to synthesize frequency reconfigurable matching networks will then be presented. Finally, these ideas will be applied to a 25W GaN S/X-band PA MMIC design. Measured results will be presented illustrating the advantages of the reconfigurable approach over existing wideband MMICs.

Prof. Larry Dunleavy

President & CEO, ModelithicsUniversity of South Florida
USA

Bio:

Dr. Larry Dunleavy is a Professor within USF’s Department of Electrical Engineering, where has been since 1990. In 2001, he co-founded Modelithics, Inc. in 2001, to provide improved modeling solutions and high-quality microwave measurement services for RF and microwave designers. Prior to this, he worked for Hughes Aircraft and E-Systems companies. Dr. Dunleavy received the B.S.E.E. degree from Michigan Technological University in 1982 and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees in 1984 and 1988, respectively, from the University of Michigan.  He was a Howard Hughes Doctoral Fellow. Dr. Dunleavy is a Senior Member of IEEE, and is active in the IEEE MTT Society and the Automatic RF Techniques Group (ARFTG). Drs. Dunleavy also served as the General Chair and Co-chair of the 2014 IEEE MTT-S IMS held in Tampa Florida.

Title:

Lecture: Moving Beyond S-Parameter Files: Advanced Scalable and 3D EM Models for Passive Devices

Workshop: Simulation-Based GaN PA Design: From Understanding Non-Linear Models to Complete PA Design Flows

Abstract:

Lecture Abstract:

For decades measured S-parameter data files have been the most commonly available “model” for representing passive devices of all kinds in the microwave industry. S-parameter files, while useful, ubiquitous and very portable, only represent the way a specific device behaves in the test fixture environment and test conditions used for the characterization. Physically motivated equivalent circuit models, properly developed, can be setup to scale accurately with part value, substrate properties and other parameters, such as solder pad dimensions.  This advance is a marked improvement and today used by many designers world-wide. Still sometimes circuit simulation is not sufficient for pre-build risk management for microwave/mm-wave designs involving compact topologies and dense circuit implementations. 

Accordingly, full-wave 3D Electromagnetic (EM) analysis has become a crucial step for radio frequency (RF) to account for possible electromagnetic coupling interactions between microwave components and between components and their surrounding shielding and interconnect environment. This unexpected coupling can result in performance degradation and, in turn, lead to costly and lengthened design cycles. Assembling the necessary geometry for completing full-wave analysis that includes representations of such passive devices as packaged and surface mount devices, packages and connectors, requires close collaboration, and in many cases reluctant sharing of manufacturing IP details, between vendors and customers of vendors and model providers. New technology, recently available in some simulators, such as ANSYS HFSS, allows for encrypting manufacturing IP that better enables 3D EM models to be shared with a wider design community.  The wider availability of encrypted 3D EM component model libraries, such as being developed under a new partnership between Modelithics and ANSYS, is anticipated to lead to a paradigm shift in the industry. This paradigm shift is making it much easier for designers to perform comprehensive pre-build full-wave EM analyses that reduce design risk and re-work and improve time-to-market for today’s increasingly compact and complex product form factors. 

Workshop Abstract:

This workshop will focus on the basic principles behind non-linear power amplifier design and simulation-based design methods utilizing Keysight Advanced Design System software. Examples will include a basic Class AB PA Design that addresses stability considerations and is designed against a specific set of gain, power, efficiency and VSWR considerations. Extensions to address other high-efficiency modes of operation such as Class F, Class J and Doherty amplifier configurations will be discussed briefly.  PA design simulation demonstrations will be performed using state-of-the-art non-linear GaN models available from Modelithics for a range of Qorvo GaN power transistors. Examples of successfully completed PA designs will also be presented.

Prof. Yonina Eldar

ProfessorDepartment of Mathematics and Computer Science, Weizmann Institute of Science
Israel

Bio:

Yonina Eldar is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rechovot, Israel. She was previously a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Technion, where she held the Edwards Chair in Engineering. She is also a Visiting Professor at MIT, a Visiting Scientist at the Broad Institute, and an Adjunct Professor at Duke University and was a Visiting Professor at Stanford. She received the B.Sc. degree in physics and the B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering both from Tel-Aviv University (TAU), Tel-Aviv, Israel, in 1995 and 1996, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, in 2002. She is a member of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, an IEEE Fellow and a EURASIP Fellow. She has received many awards for excellence in research and teaching, including the IEEE Signal Processing Society Technical Achievement Award (2013), the IEEE/AESS Fred Nathanson Memorial Radar Award (2014) and the IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award (2016). She was a Horev Fellow of the Leaders in Science and Technology program at the Technion and an Alon Fellow. She received the Michael Bruno Memorial Award from the Rothschild Foundation, the Weizmann Prize for Exact Sciences, the Wolf Foundation Krill Prize for Excellence in Scientific Research, the Henry Taub Prize for Excellence in Research (twice), the Hershel Rich Innovation Award (three times), the Award for Women with Distinguished Contributions, the Andre and Bella Meyer Lectureship, the Career Development Chair at the Technion, the Muriel & David Jacknow Award for Excellence in Teaching, and the Technion’s Award for Excellence in Teaching (two times). She received several best paper awards and best demo awards together with her research students and colleagues, was selected as one of the 50 most influential women in Israel, and was a member of the Israel Committee for Higher Education. She is the Editor in Chief of Foundations and Trends in Signal Processing and a member of several IEEE Technical Committees and Award Committees.

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Frank Ellinger

Chair for Circuit Design and Network TheoryTechnische Universität Dresden
Germany

Bio:

Prof. Frank Ellinger graduated at the University of Ulm. From ETH Zürich he received an MBA, PhD and habilitation degree. He heads the Chair for Circuit Design and Network Theory at Technische Universität Dresden since 2006. He coordinated e.g. the BMBF cluster project FAST with more than 90 partners, the DFG Priority Program FFlexCom and the EU projects DIMENSION, ADDAPT, FLEXIBILITY. Frank Ellinger has been with the IBM/ETHZ Competence Center for Advanced Silicon Electronics hosted at IBM Research in Rüschlikon. Frank Ellinger published more than 450 scientific papers, has received several awards such as the Vodafone Innovation Award, the Alcatel Lucent Science Award and an IEEE Outstanding Young Engineer Award, and was an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer.

Title:

Energy Efficient RF- and Millimeter-Wave ICs and Frontends for Communications

Abstract:

The talk focusses on energy-efficient RF- and millimeter-wave ICs. A SiGe millimeter-wave transceiver at 190 GHz with 50 Gb/s drawing a dc power of only 154 mW is present. A single-core CMOS analog to digital converter with a speed of 24 GS/s and 3 bit resolution is demonstrated. A 2.4 GHz receiver with a power consumption of only 3 µW using aggressive duty-cycling is outlined. Variable gain amplifier concepts are elaborated, which reduce the phase errors in vector modulators simplifying beamforming control. By fast DC/DC converter chips the power consumption of typical power amplifiers can be lowered by 50 %. Bandwidth adaptive RFICs are presented which reduce the power consumption by at least a factor of two. Finally, fully integrated bendable and stretchable thin-film transistor based wireless data transmitter and receiver frontends operating in the MHz-range are outlined.

Prof. Caleb Fulton

Professor of Electrical and Computer EngineeringThe University of Oklahoma
USA

Bio:

Title:

Lecture:
Advances in Mutual Coupling-Based Calibration in Digital Phased Array Systems

Tutorial:
Recent Developments and Future Trends in Digital Phased Arrays

Abstract:

Lecture:

As digital phased array systems become increasingly common relative to their analog counterparts, there are new opportunities to test, refine, and improve on a number of emerging techniques that make use of feedback paths afforded by the inherent mutual coupling between transmitting and receiving elements for the purposes of array calibration.  This talk will provide updates on increasingly realistic modeling to predict the performance of such schemes on real systems, seeking to determine guidelines for circuit- and system-level engineering decisions that will help achieve the ultimate goal of array self-calibration without the use of any external measurement equipment.

Tutorial:

In the last three decades, digital phased array technology has evolved from demonstrations in narrow-band testbeds to mature, full-scale system developments.  This tutorial will outline work done on several intermediate programs in the United States, specifically focusing on modeling and general theory, architectural aspects, calibration considerations, and dynamic range issues in these modern systems.  Details will be provided on a number of testbeds and engineering demonstrators, particularly from the University of Oklahoma, ranging from a mid-scale cylindrical array to future development opportunities at scales beyond 10,000 elements.  Finally, future research opportunities will be discussed.

Dr. Markus Gardill

Senior Software Development EngineerInnoSenT GmbH, R&D Automotive Division / Automotive Business Unit
Germany

Bio:

Markus Gardill (S'11-M'15) was born in Bamberg, Germany in 1985.
He received the Dipl.-Ing. and Dr.-Ing. degree in systems of information and multimedia technology/electrical engineering from the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany, in 2010 and 2015, respectively.

In 2010, he joined the Institute for Electronics Engineering at the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg as a research assistant and teaching fellow.
From 2014 to 2015 he was head of the team Radio Communication Technology.
In late 2015 he joined the Robert Bosch GmbH as an R&D engineer for optical and imaging metrology systems and leading the cluster of non-destructive testing for the international production network.
In 2016 he joined the automotive radar business segment of InnoSenT GmbH, where he is currently head of the team radar signal processing & tracking.

He is member serves as Distinguished Microwave Lecturer (DML) of the MTT Society for the DML term 2018-2020 with a presentation focussing automotive radar systems.

Title:

Signal Analysis and Radar Cooperation using Automotive Radar System Architectures

Abstract:

Today’s automotive radar architectures are to a large extent software defined: a modern radar frontend typically is a fully integrated MMIC providing all necessary hardware subsystems such as multiple TX and RX channels, synthesizers, timing & control engines, data converters and high speed streaming interfaces to provide CW, FMCW and Chirp-Sequence Radar functionality. Additional hardware subsystems such as phase shifters and TX switches provide further modulation degrees of freedom, necessary e.g. for coherent MIMO operation. The overall operating state of the radar is then defined by the configuration of the MMIC with all of its mentioned resources, which easily may requires up to one thousand registers to be set. And since those settings are controlled by the software running on the signal processor of the radar, the radar truly can be regarded as a software defined system.

For future radar systems, besides taking radar measurements in the traditional sense, handling of radar interference and passive/cooperative radar gains more and more attraction. Current research work typically addresses those challenges by implementing novel ideas and methods on high-performance radar test beds e.g. using FPGAs and full-band receivers.  In this presentation it will be shown how the software defined nature of today’s commercial automotive radar systems can be used to implement additional functionality such as spectral analysis and passive/cooperative radar on commercially available radar sensors by just modifying its software configuration.

Prof. Roberto D. Graglia

Professor in the Department of Electrical and Telecommunication EngineeringPolitecnico di Torino, DET Department
Italy

Bio:

Roberto D. Graglia is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Telecommunication Engineering of the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. His areas of interest comprise numerical methods for high- and low-frequency electromagnetics, theoretical and computational aspects of scattering and interactions with complex media, waveguides, antennas, electromagnetic compatibility, and low-frequency phenomena. He has organized and offered several short courses in these areas. He is a co-author of the 2016 text ``Higher-order Techniques in Computational Electromagnetics.’’

Dr. Graglia has been a Member of the editorial board of ELECTROMAGNETICS since 1997. He is a past associate editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY, and of the IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS. He was the Guest Editor of a special issue on Advanced Numerical Techniques in Electromagnetics for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION in March 1997. He has been Invited Convener at URSI General Assemblies for special sessions on Field and Waves (1996), Electromagnetic Metrology (1999), and Computational Electromagnetics (1999). He served the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) for the triennial International Symposia on Electromagnetic Theory as organizer of the Special Session on Electromagnetic Compatibility in 1998 and was the co-organizer of the special session on Numerical Methods in 2004. Since 1999, he has been the General Chairperson of the International Conference on Electromagnetics in Advanced Applications (ICEAA), and, since 2011, he has been the General Chairperson of the IEEE-APS Topical Conference on Antennas and Propagation in  Wireless Communications (IEEE-APWC).

Prof. Graglia was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 1998 for his contributions in the application of numerical techniques in the studies of electromagnetic structures, and has been an IEEE AP-S Distinguished Lecturer (2009-2012). He was the 2015 President of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society.

Title:

High-Order Modeling for Computational Electromagnetics

Abstract:

This presentation provides an overview of the last decade advances in computational electromagnetics concerning the development and use of high-order models for Moment Method and Finite Element Method applications. Various two- and three-dimensional high-order divergence- and curl-conforming vector bases used for the solution of differential and integral equations are compared and considered before presenting basis functions of either substitutive or additive kind able to model vertex, edge, and corner singularities. The implementation problems and the advantages provided by use of these higher-order models are discussed in detail thereby presenting several results.

Dr. Erich N. Grossman

Physical Measurement LaboratoryNIST

Bio:

Erich N. Grossman (M ’88, SM ’06) received the A.B. degree in physics from Harvard College in 1980, and the Ph.D., also in physics, from the California Institute of Technology in 1987. His thesis work involved development of an ultra-low noise, heterodyne receiver for 2 THz astronomy. From 1988 to 1989, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Univ. of Texas at Austin, and in 1989, he joined the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO, where he is now a physicist in the Physical Measurement Laboratory . His work at NIST focuses on infrared and submillimeter system development. Notable accomplishments include the development and demonstration of the world's highest frequency, high efficiency lithographic antennas, the world's highest frequency Josephson junctions, (awarded a Dept. of Commerce Gold Medal in 1993), and conception and early development of the SQUID multiplexer, first enabling large monolithic arrays of superconducting detectors.

More recently, he has developed several 0.1-1 THz cameras for security applications. In2010, he received the Allen V. Astin Measurement Science Award.

Title:

Submillimeter-wave Imaging: Applications and Technologies

Abstract:

Imaging at submillimeter wavelengths (expansively interpreted as 3 - 0.1 mm) has been under development for at least 30 years, but has yet to blossom into a true “industry” in the way that
infrared imaging did in the 1990’s. Technology developers often attribute this to the lack of a “killer application”, while organizations seeking to apply submm imaging often attribute it to lack of an ideal technology solution. Both viewpoints have merit, and they intersect on the question of cost.

In this presentation I will discuss some of the submm imaging applications I have encountered over many years of work in the field, both “niche” and potentially large-scale applications. Their common thread is the need to form images through some type of obscurant, whether that be clothing, atmospheric dust and fog, or manmade coatings. I’ll then describe some of the technology solutions that have been developed for submm imaging, focusing on more recent efforts, and touching briefly on some of the published work done in my lab at NIST on bolometers, bolometer arrays, scattering phenomenology, and structured illumination imaging.

Prof. Amelie Hagelauer

ProfessorUniversity of Bayreuth
Germany

Bio:

Amelie Hagelauer received the Dipl.-Ing. degree in mechatronics and the Dr.-Ing. degree in electrical engineering from the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany in 2007 and 2013, respectively. She joined the Institute for Electronics Engineering in November 2007, where she was working on thin film BAW filters towards her PhD. Since 2013 she is focusing on SAW/BAW and RF MEMS components, as well as integrated circuits for frontends up to 180 GHz. Dr. Hagelauer has been the Chair of MTT-2 Microwave Acoustics since 2015. Since 2016 she is leading a Research Group on Electronic Circuits. She is continuously contributing to the development of RF Acoustics community by organizing workshops and student design competitions. She has been acting as a Guest Editor for a special issue of the IEEE MTT Transactions on the topic “RF Frontends for Mobile Radio” as well as for a special issue in the MDPI Journal Sensors on the topic “Surface Acoustic Wave and Bulk Acoustic Wave Sensors”.

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Yejun He

Director of Guangdong Engineering Research Center of Base Station Antennas and Propagation
Director of Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Antennas and Propagation
Shenzhen University
China

Bio:

Yejun He is a full professor with the College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Shenzhen University, China, where he is the Director of Guangdong Engineering Research Center of Base Station Antennas and Propagation, and the Director of Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Antennas and Propagation, Shenzhen. Prof. He received the Ph.D. degree in Information and Communication engineering from Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan, China, in 2005. He is a Fellow of IET, and a Chair of IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society-Shenzhen Chapter. He has authored or coauthored more than 140 research papers and books (chapters) and holds 20 patents. His research interests include wireless mobile communication, antennas and radio frequency.

Title:

Polar Codes: Overview, Recent Research and Challenges

Abstract:

Polar code is the only channel coding method that can reach the Shannon limit in theory so far. The construction of polar code is based on the phenomenon of channel polarization. In this talk, we firstly start with an overview of channel coding. Then we analyze the channel polarization phenomena and introduce recent advances of polar codes. How to construct and decode is very important for improving the performance of polar codes. We will introduce our work in construction and decoding algorithm for polar codes. Finally, we discuss the challenges of polar codes.

Dr. Sherry Hess

Vice President of MarketingAWR Group
National Instruments
USA

Bio:

Sherry Hess has 15+ years of electronic design automation (EDA) software experience in the RF/microwave industry. Prior employers included Inte, Ansoft (now Ansys), and AWR Corporation (now National Instruments).

In addition to her current VP responsibilities, Sherry holds key roles within the IEEE MTT-S organization, serving as an AdCom officer and vice-chair of Women in Microwaves (WIM).  Her IEEE activities have evolved into becoming an international voice for WIM. She participates regularly on panels worldwide, organizes and promotes various networking events, and contributes guest editorials and blogs advocating for WIM.

Sherry holds both a BSEE and an MBA from CMU in Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Vadim Issakov

University of Magdeburg
Germany

Bio:

Vadim Issakov received M.Sc. degree (cum laude) in microwave engineering from the Technical University of Munich and Ph.D. degree from the University of Paderborn, Germany (summa cum laude) in 2006 and 2010, respectively.

He is a principal engineer and a technical lead of a research group at Infineon Technologies AG in Munich, working on mm-wave circuit design in CMOS and BiCMOS technologies for radar, communication and industrial applications.

His current research interests include circuit design for highly integrated millimeter-wave systems for communication and radar applications, as well as modelling and characterization techniques for mm-wave circuits.

Title:

Co-simulation and co-design of Chip-Package-Board Interfaces in Highly-Integrated RF Systems

Abstract:

Level of integration of RF and mm-wave systems is continuously increasing. Highly integrated system on chip solutions have to be encapsulated in a package and assembled on PCB to be attractive as a product. However, electrical properties of the package and PCB may have a significant effect on system parameters, especially at high frequencies. Hence, layout features of package and PCB must be carefully modelled and considered during the design. Furthermore, it is often insufficient to model chip, package and PCB separately, as some high-frequency effects may not be captured, as e.g. electromagnetic coupling between integrated coils on chip and routing traces in package. It is advantageous to consider the electrical properties of the package and PCB already during the circuit design phase. In this talk the speaker describes a co-simulation and co-design methodology by means of accurate EM modelling for highly-integrated RF systems. We discuss the approach and various aspects of chip/package/board co-design on examples of systems for various applications: 24 GHz automotive radar transceiver; backhaul communication system in package at 60, 70 and 80 GHz in SiGe technology and a four-channel 77-GHz SiGe automotive radar transceiver in a package with four dipole antennas.

Prof. Yogendra Joshi

ProfessorG.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering
Georgia Institute of Technology
USA

Bio:

Yogendra Joshi is Professor and John M. McKenney and Warren D. Shiver Distinguished Chair at the G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology.  His research interests are in multi-scale thermal management.  He is the author or co-author of nearly four hundred publications in this area, including nearly two hundred journal articles. He received his B. Tech. in Mechanical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology (Kanpur) in 1979, M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1981, and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, from the University of Pennsylvania in 1984.  He has served as the Principal Investigator for multiple Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) programs, and Office of Naval Research Consortium for Resource-Secure Outposts (CORSO).  He has held visiting faculty appointments at Stanford University, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, and Xi'an Jiaotong University.  He is an elected Fellow of the ASME, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and IEEE. He was a co-recipient of ASME Curriculum Innovation Award (1999), Inventor Recognition Award from the Semiconductor Research Corporation (2001), the ASME Electronic and Photonic Packaging Division Outstanding Contribution Award in Thermal Management (2006), ASME J. of Electronics Packaging Best Paper of the Year Award (2008), IBM Faculty Award (2008), IEEE SemiTherm Significant Contributor Award (2009), IIT Kanpur Distinguished Alumnus Award (2011), ASME InterPack Achievement Award (2011), ITherm Achievement Award (2012), ASME Heat Transfer Memorial Award (2013), and AIChE Donald Q. Kern Award (2018).

Title:

Thermal Management of Heterogeneous Microsystems

Abstract:

With the recent end of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, which has guided research on thermal packaging of microprocessors for nearly a quarter century, significantly different challenges are on the horizon for compact, high performance microsystems.  Heterogeneous integration through chip stacking promises to bring in multiple system functionalities such as logic, memory, and radio frequency in highly compact form factors, along with great challenges to thermal management.  I will discuss recent and ongoing computational and experimental research on microfluidic cooling and sub-mm vapor chambers to address the high heat fluxes, and localized hot spots in these applications.

Prof. Ingmar Kallfass

Chair for Robust Power Semiconductor Systems University of Stuttgart
Germany

Bio:

Ingmar Kallfass received the Dipl.-Ing. degree in Electrical Engineering from University of Stuttgart in 2000, and the Dr.-Ing. degree from University of Ulm in 2005. In 2001, he worked as a visiting researcher at the National University of Ireland, Dublin. In 2002, he joined the department of Electron Devices and Circuits of University of Ulm as a teaching and research assistant. In 2005, he joined the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid-State Physics. From 2009 to 2012, he was a professor at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Since 2013, he holds the chair for Robust Power Semiconductor Systems at the University of Stuttgart, where his major fields of research are compound semiconductor based circuits and systems for power and microwave electronics.

Title:

High System Gain E-Band Link in a Wideband Aircraft-to-Ground Data Transmission

Abstract:

A wireless communication link operating in E-band at 71-76 GHz with 30 dBm of transmit power from a GaN-based solid-state power amplifier and a 3-dB noise figure of its GaAs-based receiver is employed in a data transmission with up to 9.8 Gbit/s data rate between a plane and a ground station. Flying at a height of 1000 m above ground and at distances between 5 and 12 km from the receiver, a microlight aircraft hosts the payload mounted to its wing. The highly directional link is formed by a 39.7 dBi gain Cassegrain parabolic antenna in the plane-mounted transmitter, and a 48.7 dBi Cassegrain antenna with GPS-based antenna tracking in the ground terminal. Stable data links were established with up to 9.8 Gbit/s data rate employing QPSK, 8-PSK and 16-QAM modulation.

Dr. Allen Katz

Professor of Electrical/Computer EngineeringThe College of New Jersey (TCNJ)
USA

Bio:

Dr. Allen Katz is a professor of Electrical/Computer Engineering at The College of New Jersey.  He is the founder and President of Linearizer Technology, Inc, which now includes Linear Photonics, LLC and Linear Space Technology, LLC.  He received his doctorate and baccalaureate degrees in electrical engineering from New Jersey Institute of Technology and a masters degree in electrical engineering from Rutgers University.  Prof. Katz holds 17 patents and has written more than 100 technical publications.  He received the IEEE’s Microwave Society’s (MTT-S) Application Award in 2015 for his work in linearization, the IEEE Microwave Magazine Best Paper Award in 2010 and the William Randolph Lovelace II Award for outstanding contributions to space science and technology from the American Astronautical Society in 2002.  He has also served as a MTT-S Distinguished Microwave Lecturer.  Dr. Katz is a Fellow of the IEEE and has served the MTT-S in numerous capacities. He is chair of the joint AP/ED/MTT chapter in the IEEE Princeton/Central Jersey Section and was the Technical Program Committee co-chair for the IMS2018 in Philadelphia.

Title:

Advances in the Linearization of Microwave and Millimeter-wave Power Amplifiers

Abstract:

This talk provides the various trade-offs involved in the decision to include linearization in the design of microwave and millimeter-wave power amplifiers.  Emphasis will be placed on efficiently producing linear power over very wide (multi-GHz and octave) bandwidths and at frequencies to 100 GHz and above.  The latest developments in power amplifier technology, including millimeter-wave GaN devices will be considered.  The application of linearization to linear photonic transmission systems will also be considered.

Dr. Rudolf Lachner

Consulting: “Semiconductors and Sensors for Safe Driving”Semiconductors and Sensors for Safe Driving
Germany

Bio:

5.02.1952
Born in Parsberg / Oberpfalz, Bavaria

1971-1978
Studied physics at the Technical University of Munich

1978
Received diploma degree in physics from the Technical University of Munich

1978-1984
Scientific assistant at the Technical University of Munich

1984
Received Dr. rer. nat. degree from the Technical University of Munich

Joint Siemens Semiconductors (which became Infineon Technologies AG in 1999)

1984-1989
Development engineer for high frequency- and analog / mixed signal bipolar processes at Infineon

1990-1996
Head of bipolar- und bicmos-technology development

1997-2003
Department head for technology development within the Wireless Communications division

2004-2017
Responsible for automotive radar technology development

Overall project leader of large national and international funding projects (KOKON, ROCC, DOT5, DOT7,…)

2005-2017
Senior Principal „RF Technology“

Since 9/2017
Retired; Consultant for “Semiconductors and Sensors for Safe Driving”

Title:

Present State and Future Trends in Automotive Radar

Abstract:

The talk gives an overview of present commercial automotive radars in the 76-81 GHz range. These radars are adequate to support ADAS applications up to a level 2 of autonomous driving. Higher automated driving levels of 3 and beyond impose very challenging requirements on reliable environmental sensing. Current development activities to achieve these requirements with radar will be presented as well.

Dr. Iñigo Liberal

“Jovenes Investigadores” fellow the Institute of Smart Cities (ISC)Public University of Navarra (UPNA)
Spain

Bio:

Iñigo Liberal received the Engineer's (2009), M.Sc. (2010) and Ph. D. (2013), magna cum laude, degrees in Telecommunication Engineering from the Public University of Navarra (UPNA), Spain. He was a visiting student at Delft University of Technology (Delft, The Netherlands), and a visiting researcher at Aalto University (Espoo, Finland), the University of Arizona (Tucson, USA) and the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, USA).

He currently is a “Jovenes Investigadores” fellow the Institute of Smart Cities (ISC), Public University of Navarra (UPNA), Spain. His current research interests include quantum optics, nanophotonics, metamaterials and antenna theory. He was the recipient of the best photonics paper award in Metamaterials’2018 in Espoo, Finland, the best theory paper award in Metamaterials’2017 in Marseille, France, and a Young Scientist Award in EMTS’2016.

Title:

Lecture 1
Quantum emission between the weak and strong coupling regimes

Lecture 2
Highly-directive systems inspired by physical bounds on scattering processes

Abstract:

Prof. Andrea Massa

ELEDIA Research Center Director
Full Professor, DISI@University of Trento, Italy
Professor, CentraleSupélec, France
Visiting Professor, Tsinghua University, China
Guest Professor, UESTC, China

Bio:

Andrea Massa (IEEE Fellow, IET Fellow, Electromagnetic Academy Fellow) he has been a Full Professor of Electromagnetic Fields @ University of Trento since 2005. 

At present, Prof. Massa is the director of the network of federated laboratories "ELEDIA Research Center" located in Brunei, China, Czech, France, Greece, Italy, Japan, Perש, Tunisia with more than 150 researchers. Moreover, he is Professor @ CentraleSupיlec (Paris - France), Guest Professor @ UESCT (Chengdu - China), and Visiting Professor @ Tsinghua (Beijing - China). 

He has been holder of a Senior DIGITEO Chair @ L2S-CentraleSupיlec and CEA LIST in Saclay (France), UC3M-Santander Chair of Excellence @ Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Madrid - Spain), Adjunct Professor @ Penn State University (USA), Visiting Professor @ Missouri University of Science and Technology (USA), the Nagasaki University (Japan), the University of Paris Sud (France), the Kumamoto University (Japan), and the National University of Singapore (Singapore). 
Prof. Massa is member of the Editorial Board of the “Journal of Electromagnetic Waves and Applications” and of the European School of Antennas (ESoA). It has been appointed IEEE AP-S Distinguished Lecturer (2016-2018) and served as Associate Editor of the "IEEE Transaction on Antennas and Propagation" (2011-2014). 

His research activities are mainly concerned with inverse problems, antenna analysis/synthesis, radar systems and signal processing, cross-layer optimization and planning of wireless/RF systems, system-by-design and material-by-design (metamaterials and reconfigurable-materials), and theory/applications of optimization techniques to engineering problems (coms, medicine, and biology).

Prof. Massa published more than 350 scientific publications on international journals and more than 500 in international conferences (>200 invited). He has organized more than 100 scientific sessions in international conferences and has participated to several technological projects in the EU framework (>20 EU Projects), at the national and local level with national agencies (>300 Projects/Grants).

Title:

Unconventional Array Design for New Generation Communications and Sensing Systems
"Solution towards 'widescan/wideband/agile/reconfigurable/modular/ligth/multi-functional' systems"

Abstract:

Teachers:

Andrea MassaGiacomo OliveriPaolo Rocca

Course Program

  1. Introduction to Antenna Arrays
  2. Antenna Arrays Classification
  3. Short Review of Conventional Arrays and Synthesis Techniques
  4. Focus on Unconventional Arrays and Trends in Synthesis Techniques
    • Thinned Arrays
    • Sparse Arrays
    • Clustered/Tiled Arrays
    • Overlapped/Multi-Function Arrays
  5. Review on Advances on Unconventional Arrays Applications
    • Telecommunication Applications (towards 5G and beyond)
    • Radars/Sensing Applications
    • Biomedical Applications
    • Wireless Power Transmission Applications
  6. Conclusions and Final Remarks
    • New Trends in Theory/Techniques/Applications

 

Short Course Description

Antenna arrays are a key technology in several Electromagnetics applicative scenarios, including satellite and ground wireless communications, MIMO systems, remote sensing, biomedical imaging, radar, wireless power transmission, and radioastronomy.

Because of their wide range of application, the large number of degrees of freedom at hand (e.g., type, position, and excitation of each radiating element), the available architectures, and the possible objectives ranging from the standard radiation features (e.g.,maximum directivity, minimum side lobes, maximum beam efficiency) to the multi-physics constraints (e.g., power consumption, thermal diffusion and cooling, weight, robustness, tolerance/variantions vs atmospheric agents) until the more advances systemistic criteria (reconfigurability, multi-functionality, frequency-agility, wideband/wide-scanning, quantum properties/features, etc.), the synthesis of arrays turns out to be a complex task which cannot be tackled by a single methodology.
Despite a wide heterogeneity, most of the synthesis approaches share a common theoretical framework, which is of paramount importance for all engineers and students interested in such a topic.

The objective of the short course is therefore to provide the attendees the fundamentals of Antenna Array synthesis, starting from intuitive explanations to rigorous mathematical and methodological insights about their behavior and design. Moreover, recent synthesis methodologies will be also discussed with particular emphasis on unconventional architectures for complex communications and radar systems within a new optimality framework. More specifically, advanced methodologies and architectures will be introduced, and their application in the synthesis of linear arrays will be illustrated also with a set of "Hands on" software classes.

Dr. Kumar Vijay Mishra

United States Army Research Laboratory
USA

Bio:

Kumar Vijay Mishra received his B.Tech. degree, summa cum laude (Gold medal, honors), in electronics and communications engineering from the National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, India, in 2003, his M.S. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Colorado State University, Fort Collins, in 2012, and his Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering and M.S. degree in mathematics from The University of Iowa, Iowa City, in 2015 while working on NASA Global Precipitation Mission Ground Validation program weather radars. He has been a research scientist at eLectronics and Radar Development Establishment (LRDE), Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), India (2003-2007); visiting researcher at The University of Iowa (2015-2019); and postdoctoral fellow at Technion, Israel (2015-2017). He is the recipient of Royal Meteorological Society Quarterly Journal Editor’s Prize (2017), the Andrew and Erna Finci Viterbi Postdoctoral Fellowship (2015 and 2016), the Lady Davis Postdoctoral Fellowship (2016), and the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) Lab Scientist of the Year Award (2006). Currently, he is the technical advisor to the automotive radar start-up Hertzwell, Singapore; an honorary research fellow at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability, and Trust, University of Luxembourg; and the Harry Diamond Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, supported by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. His research interests include radar theory and hardware design, remote sensing, signal processing, deep learning, and electromagnetics. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE.

Title:

Recent Advances in Joint Radar-Communications Processing

Abstract:

Synergistic design of communications and radar systems with common spectral and hardware resources is defining a new era towad efficient utilization of radio-frequency spectrum. This joint radar-communications (JRC) model has advantages of low cost, compact size, less power consumption, resource sharing, and safety. Today, the JRC at the higher end of the RF spectrum, i.e., the millimeter wave (mm-Wave), is attracting significant research interest because of emerging cutting-edge radar and communications applications in this band. Major challenges in realizing mm-Wave JRC are joint waveform design and performance criteria that would optimally trade off between communications and radar functionalities. This talk will give an overview of advances in JRC with an emphasis on mmWave.

Dr. Dmitri Mogilevtsev

Institute of PhysicsNational Academy of Sciences
Belarus

Bio:

Dmitri Mogilevtsev graduated the Belarus State University in 1991. Since 1991 he is working in the Institute of Physics, Belarus National Academy of Sciences. He received Ph.D. in 1995, and Dr.Sc. in 2008 from the Institute of Physics, Belarus National Academy of Sciences. In 2017 he was elected a Corresponding Member of  Belarus National Academy of Sciences. Currently, he is the Vice-Head of the Center for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, and the Head of the Belarusian Physical Society. Dmitri Mogilevtsev's research interests are in quantum optics, quantum tomography, imaging, and sensing.

Title:

Abstract:

Dr. Ivan Ndip

Department Head of RF & Smart Sensor SystemsFraunhofer IZM
Germany

Bio:

Ivan Ndip has been with the Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration, IZM, Berlin since 2000. He leads the Department of RF & Smart Sensor Systems at IZM, where he directs R&D activities in five research groups, and manages the department. Ivan and his team currently work on the development of reconfigurable 5G mmWave systems, RF & high-speed modules, high resolution radar sensors as well as on ultra-low power wireless sensor nodes. Ivan studied Electrical Engineering at TU Berlin. He received the Dipl.-Ing. (M.Sc.) degree, and the Dr.-Ing. degree (Ph.D.) with the highest distinction (summa cum laude), in Electrical Engineering from TU Berlin in 2002 and 2006, respectively. In 2017, he completed the Habilitation, and received the Dr.-Ing. habil. degree (a higher doctorate) in Electrical Engineering from the Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus-Senftenberg, Germany.

Ivan has authored and coauthored more than 175 publications in referred international journals and conference proceedings, and is a recipient of numerous Best Paper Awards.

 

Title:

Role of Electronic Packaging in 5G

Abstract:

5G will transform our lives, economy and society. The development of 5G millimeter-wave (mmWave) systems is a challenging task which requires efficient hardware implementation of massive MIMO and hybrid beamforming architectures at mmWave frequencies. For this implementation, advanced electronic packaging platforms and technologies which enable cost-effective, low-loss, reliable and compact integration of high gain mmWave antenna arrays, passive components, RF front-end ICs with beamforming functionalities and baseband ICs are required.

In this talk, the role of electronic packaging platforms and technologies on the performance, cost, reliability and miniaturization of emerging 5G mmWave systems will be extensively discussed.

Prof. Alexander I. Nosich

Institute of Radio-Physics and ElectronicsNational Academy of Sciences
Ukraine

Bio:

Alexander I. Nosich was born in 1953 in Kharkiv, Ukraine. He received the M.S., Ph.D., and D.Sc. (higher doctorate) degrees in radio physics from the Kharkiv National University, Ukraine, in 1975, 1979, and 1990, respectively. Since 1979, he has been with the Institute of Radio Physics and Electronics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, in Kharkiv, where he is currently Professor and Principal Scientist heading the Laboratory of Micro and Nano Optics. In 2004, Prof. Nosich was elected IEEE Fellow, for contributions of computational electromagnetics to the theory of antennas and open waveguides. In 2015 he was awarded the title of Doctor Honoris Causa of the University of Rennes 1, France. In 2017, he was recipient of the Galileo Galilei Medal of the International Commission for Optics. His research interests include computational electromagnetics and photonics, methods of integral equations, analytical regularization, propagation, radiation, and scattering of waves in open configurations, electromagnetic modeling of micro and nano lasers on threshold, and the history of microwaves.

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Giacomo Oliveri

Associate Professor, Department of Information Engineering and Computer ScienceUniversity of Trento
Italy

Bio:

Giacomo Oliveri received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in Telecommunications Engineering and the PhD degree in Space Sciences and Engineering from the University of Genoa, Italy, in 2003, 2005, and 2009 respectively. He is currently an Associate Professor at the Department of Information Engineering and Computer Science (University of Trento) and a member of the ELEDIA Research Center. Moreover, he is Adjunct Professor at CentraleSupélec and member of the Laboratoire des signaux et systèmes (L2S)@CentraleSupélec Gif-sur-Yvette (France). He has been a visiting researcher at L2S in 2012, 2013, and 2015, and he has been an Invited Associate Professor at the University of Paris Sud, France, in 2014.

He is author/co-author of over 330 peer reviewed papers on international journals and conferences. His research work is mainly focused on electromagnetic direct and inverse problems, system-by-design and metamaterials, and antenna array synthesis. Prof. Oliveri serves as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, of the IEEE Journal on Multiscale and Multiphysics Computational Techniques, of the International Journal of Antennas and Propagation, of the International Journal of Distributed Sensor Networks, and of the Microwave Processing journal. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE, and the Chair of the IEEE AP/ED/MTT North Italy Chapter.

Title:

Unconventional Array Design for New Generation Communications and Sensing Systems
"Solution towards 'widescan/wideband/agile/reconfigurable/modular/ligth/multi-functional' systems"

Abstract:

Teachers:

Andrea MassaGiacomo OliveriPaolo Rocca

Course Program

  1. Introduction to Antenna Arrays
  2. Antenna Arrays Classification
  3. Short Review of Conventional Arrays and Synthesis Techniques
  4. Focus on Unconventional Arrays and Trends in Synthesis Techniques
    • Thinned Arrays
    • Sparse Arrays
    • Clustered/Tiled Arrays
    • Overlapped/Multi-Function Arrays
  5. Review on Advances on Unconventional Arrays Applications
    • Telecommunication Applications (towards 5G and beyond)
    • Radars/Sensing Applications
    • Biomedical Applications
    • Wireless Power Transmission Applications
  6. Conclusions and Final Remarks
    • New Trends in Theory/Techniques/Applications


Short Course Description

Antenna arrays are a key technology in several Electromagnetics applicative scenarios, including satellite and ground wireless communications, MIMO systems, remote sensing, biomedical imaging, radar, wireless power transmission, and radioastronomy.

Because of their wide range of application, the large number of degrees of freedom at hand (e.g., type, position, and excitation of each radiating element), the available architectures, and the possible objectives ranging from the standard radiation features (e.g.,maximum directivity, minimum side lobes, maximum beam efficiency) to the multi-physics constraints (e.g., power consumption, thermal diffusion and cooling, weight, robustness, tolerance/variantions vs atmospheric agents) until the more advances systemistic criteria (reconfigurability, multi-functionality, frequency-agility, wideband/wide-scanning, quantum properties/features, etc.), the synthesis of arrays turns out to be a complex task which cannot be tackled by a single methodology.
Despite a wide heterogeneity, most of the synthesis approaches share a common theoretical framework, which is of paramount importance for all engineers and students interested in such a topic.

The objective of the short course is therefore to provide the attendees the fundamentals of Antenna Array synthesis, starting from intuitive explanations to rigorous mathematical and methodological insights about their behavior and design. Moreover, recent synthesis methodologies will be also discussed with particular emphasis on unconventional architectures for complex communications and radar systems within a new optimality framework. More specifically, advanced methodologies and architectures will be introduced, and their application in the synthesis of linear arrays will be illustrated also with a set of "Hands on" software classes.

Dr. Mario Pauli

Senior Academic CouncillorKarlsruhe Institute of Technology
Germany

Bio:

Mario Pauli (S’04, M’10, SM´19) received the Dipl.-Ing. (M.S.E.E.) degree in electrical engineering from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany, in 2003 and the Dr.-Ing. (Ph.D.E.E.) from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in 2011. In 2002, he spent four months at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY, working on time and frequency domain measurement systems for the characterization of the 60 GHz indoor radio channel.

From 2004 to 2011 he has been with the Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik und Elektronik (IHE), University of Karlsruhe, as a Research Assistant. Since 2011 he is with the Institute of Radio Frequency Engineering and Electronics (IHE) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as a Senior Researcher and Lecturer.

He served as a Lecturer for radar and smart antennas of the Carl Cranz Series for Scientific Education. He is currently a co-founder and the Managing Director of PKTEC GmbH and a co-founder of Wellenzahl Radar- und Sensortechnik GmbH & Co. KG.

His current research interests include radar and sensor systems, RCS measurements, antennas, millimeter-wave packaging.

Title:

Multistatic MIMO OFDM Radar for Drone Detection

Abstract:

OFDM signals are well suited for passive and active multistatic radar systems due to their constant carrier frequency and thus relaxed efforts for frequency synchronization in comparison to FMCW based signals. Furthermore, frequency and time shifts can be corrected to a certain degree during signal processing. Active multistatic radar systems additionally offer the advantage that the transmit signal and the position of the transmitter are known and can be arbitrarily controlled. In combination with MIMO such systems could be used to detect small objects with a highly angular dependent radar cross section like drones as well as to relax the demands for decoupling of transmitters and receivers.

Prof. Zoya Popovic

Distinguished Professor and the Lockheed Martin Endowed Chair of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Colorado
USA

Bio:

Zoya Popovic (S’86–M’90–SM’99–F’02) is a Distinguished Professor and the Lockheed Martin Endowed Chair of Electrical Engineering at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She obtained her Dipl.Ing. degree at the University of Belgrade, Serbia, and her Ph.D. at Caltech. She was a Visiting Professor with the Technical University of Munich in 2001/3, ISAE in Toulouse, France in 2014, and is Chair of Excellence at Carlos III University in Madrid in 2018/19. She has graduated 58 PhDs and currently advises 14 doctoral students. Her research interests are in high-efficiency power amplifiers and transmitters, microwave and millimeter-wave high-performance circuits for communications and radar, medical applications of microwaves, millimeter-wave and THz quasi-optical techniques and wireless powering. She is a Fellow of the IEEE and the recipient of two IEEE MTT Microwave Prizes for best journal papers, the White House NSF Presidential Faculty Fellow award, the URSI Issac Koga Gold Medal, the ASEE/HP Terman Medal and the German Humboldt Research Award. She was elected as foreign member of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts in 2006. She was named IEEE MTT Distinguished Educator in 2013 and the University of Colorado Distinguished Research Lecturer in 2015. 

Title:

Efficient and Linear GaN Power Amplifiers for Broadband High PAPR Signals

Supply-Modulated Power Amplifiers for Efficiency Enhancement

Wireless Powering- From Harvesting µW/CM2 to KW Capacitive Powering for Vehicles

Abstract:

Efficient and Linear GaN Power Amplifiers  for Broadband High PAPR Signals

This talk overviews approaches for efficient amplification of several signal scenarios with wide instantaneous bandwidths, for carriers from 2 to 20GHz. First two dual-band hybrid GaN PAs in concurrent operation are described: a 2.3/3/9GHz single-ended PA and a 3.5/5.8GHz dual-band dual-load PA. The two bands are widely separated in each case. Then an octave-bandwidth 2-4GHz hybrid PA is presented with multiple simultaneous widely-spaced signals. Finally, a 10-GHz band and 17.5-20.5GHz GaN MMIC PA with >100MHz multi-carrier signals are discussed. In all cases, the designs focus on high efficiency and linearization for multiple simultaneous signals. It is shown that dynamic supply modulation is an effective method for efficiency enhancement even for extremely broadband signals, and that both digital and analog pre-distortion can be applied to meet system demands.

Supply-Modulated Power Amplifiers for Efficiency Enhancement

Supply modulation (envelope tracking) can improve PA efficiency if both the PA and the envelope modulator (dynamic supply) are efficient and the dynamic supply has a slew rate that corresponds to many times the signal bandwidth. For very wideband signals, continuous supply modulators in switching operation have degraded efficiency and other approaches are proposed with average (reduced slew rate) tracking. This in turn introduces nonlinearities and pre-distortion is required, which typically negatively impacts either efficiency or output power. The increasing demand for the same PA to amplify simultaneous signals over a wide RF bandwidth compounds the difficulty of obtaining efficiency and linearity simultaneously, over a range of output power levels.  This tutorial will overview the benefits and challenges of supply-modulated efficient PAs through examples ranging from a hybrid 2-4GHz octave-bandwidth PA for amplifying multiple widely spaced carriers, to X-band MMIC PAs with GaN MMIC discrete supply modulators, and a 18-25GHz MMIC GaN PA for >200MHz bandlimited noise signals with reduced slew-rate tracking and analog predistortion for gain linearization. 

Wireless Powering- From Harvesting µW/CM2 to KW Capacitive Powering for Vehicles

This tutorial overviews wireless power transfer for power levels from mW to kW. The ultra-low power density application is in far-field harvesting at GHz frequencies for unattended wireless sensors and IoT devices. Several examples will be shown, including harvesting sidelobes from a 4.3GHz altimeter radar antenna on a Boeing 737 aircraft for powering health-monitoring aircraft sensors. At the high power levels, near-field capacitive power transfer is chosen in the 6 MHz range for powering stationary vehicles and vehicles in motion. In this case, over 85% efficiency is achieved for 1kW of capacitive power transfer while meeting safety standards in the vicinity of the vehicle through a near-field phased array approach. Other approaches, such as power beaming and multi-mode shielded wireless powering will also be discussed.

Prof. Sembiam R. Rengarajan

Professor of Electrical and Computer EngineeringCalifornia State University
USA

Bio:

Sembiam R. Rengarajan (Life Fellow, IEEE) received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of New Brunswick, Canada in 1980. Since then he has been with California State University, Northridge (CSUN), CA, presently serving as a Professor and Chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, He has held visiting appointments at UCLA, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain, the University of Pretoria, South Africa, and the Technical University of Denmark. His research interests include application of electromagnetics to antennas, scattering, and passive microwave and millimeter wave components. He has published more than 250 journal articles and conference papers. He has served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation (2000-03) and as the Chair of the Education Committee of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (APS). He received the Preeminent Scholarly Publication Award from CSUN in 2005, CSUN Research Fellow Award in 2010, a Distinguished Engineering Educator of the Year Award from the Engineers' Council of California in 1995, and 20 awards from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for his innovative research and technical contributions to Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In 2011 he was appointed as a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE APS. Presently he serves as the Chair of USNC-URSI. Dr. Rengarajan is the local organizing Committee Chair of the URSI Commission B International Symposium on Electromagnetic Theory to be held in San Diego, CA in May 2019.

Title:

Abstract:

Dr. Vishal Riché

Radar System EngineerIndustry Department of InnoSent GmbH
Germany

Bio:

Dr. Vishal Riché received the M.S. degree in signal and circuit from the University of western Brittany, France, in 2009. In 2013, he received the Ph.D. degree in signal processing and telecommunication from the University of Rennes 1, France, working on radar system dedicated to specific SAR applications (remote sensing, MIMO configuration).

In 2013, he joined the Fraunhofer Institute FHR, as a researcher for the application of nonconventional waveform for radar application (orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing waveform and discrete frequency coded waveform). 

Since 2016, he joined the industry department of InnoSent GmbH where he is currently a radar system engineer. He currently works on the development of radars for industrial applications with a specialization on MIMO radar.

Title:

MIMO radar for monitoring applications

Abstract:

Nowadays, security applications require multi detection capability, higher accuracy and higher spatial resolution while keeping a small form factor. In order to solve these challenges, the MIMO concept has been considered as a potential solution. Moreover, MIMO technology has matured enough over the years to be considered for industrial applications.

This talk provides an overview of MIMO radar and the challenges that are still under research. The first part will briefly explain the challenges expected in monitoring radar (from security radar to traffic monitoring radar), why MIMO radar is interesting for certain applications and an explanation on how a MIMO radar works. Then, the transmitter part will be describe before looking in detail on the waveform design (FMCW /SFCW /OFDM / DFCW / PMCW). Pros and cons of each waveform and their limitations will be described (interference problem, implementation problem …). The next part will look on spatial resolution and the digital beamforming concept before comparing the different methods existing (delay and sum (Bartlett beamformer), CAPON, MUSIC, compressed sensing …) and what are their pros and cons for industrial application. The last part will talk about hardware implementation, technological limitation, quality and compromise between hardware, preprocessing (radar signal processing) and post processing (tracker, classification) and will present actual MIMO radar developed for monitoring application, their aims and limitations.

Prof. Paolo Rocca

Associate Professor, Department of Information Engineering and Computer ScienceUniversity of Trento
Italy

Bio:

Paolo Rocca (IEEE Senior Member) received the MS degree in Telecommunications Engineering from the University of Trento in 2005 (summa cum laude) and the PhD Degree in Information and Communication Technologies from the same University in 2008. He is currently Associate Professor at the Department of Information Engineering and Computer Science (University of Trento) and a member of the ELEDIA Research Center. In April 2017, Prof. Rocca received the National Scientific Qualification for the position of Full Professor.

Prof. Rocca is the author/co-author of over 300 peer-reviewed papers on international journals and conferences. He has been a visiting Ph.D. student at the Pennsylvania State University (U.S.A.), at the University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria (Italy), and a visiting researcher at the Laboratoire des Signaux et Systèmes (L2S@ Supèlec, France) in 2012 and 2013. Moreover, he has been an Invited Professor at the University of Paris Sud (France) in 2015 and at the University of Rennes 1 (France) in 2017. Prof. Rocca has been awarded from the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society and the Italy Section with the best PhD thesis award IEEE-GRS Central Italy Chapter. His main interests are in the framework of artificial intelligence (optimization and machine learning) techniques as applied to electromagnetics, antenna array synthesis and design, and electromagnetic inverse scattering. He served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters in the period 2011-2016.

Title:

Unconventional Array Design for New Generation Communications and Sensing Systems
"Solution towards 'widescan/wideband/agile/reconfigurable/modular/ligth/multi-functional' systems"

Abstract:

Teachers:

Andrea MassaGiacomo OliveriPaolo Rocca

Course Program

  1. Introduction to Antenna Arrays
  2. Antenna Arrays Classification
  3. Short Review of Conventional Arrays and Synthesis Techniques
  4. Focus on Unconventional Arrays and Trends in Synthesis Techniques
    • Thinned Arrays
    • Sparse Arrays
    • Clustered/Tiled Arrays
    • Overlapped/Multi-Function Arrays
  5. Review on Advances on Unconventional Arrays Applications
    • Telecommunication Applications (towards 5G and beyond)
    • Radars/Sensing Applications
    • Biomedical Applications
    • Wireless Power Transmission Applications
  6. Conclusions and Final Remarks
    • New Trends in Theory/Techniques/Applications

 

Short Course Description

Antenna arrays are a key technology in several Electromagnetics applicative scenarios, including satellite and ground wireless communications, MIMO systems, remote sensing, biomedical imaging, radar, wireless power transmission, and radioastronomy.

Because of their wide range of application, the large number of degrees of freedom at hand (e.g., type, position, and excitation of each radiating element), the available architectures, and the possible objectives ranging from the standard radiation features (e.g.,maximum directivity, minimum side lobes, maximum beam efficiency) to the multi-physics constraints (e.g., power consumption, thermal diffusion and cooling, weight, robustness, tolerance/variantions vs atmospheric agents) until the more advances systemistic criteria (reconfigurability, multi-functionality, frequency-agility, wideband/wide-scanning, quantum properties/features, etc.), the synthesis of arrays turns out to be a complex task which cannot be tackled by a single methodology.
Despite a wide heterogeneity, most of the synthesis approaches share a common theoretical framework, which is of paramount importance for all engineers and students interested in such a topic.

The objective of the short course is therefore to provide the attendees the fundamentals of Antenna Array synthesis, starting from intuitive explanations to rigorous mathematical and methodological insights about their behavior and design. Moreover, recent synthesis methodologies will be also discussed with particular emphasis on unconventional architectures for complex communications and radar systems within a new optimality framework. More specifically, advanced methodologies and architectures will be introduced, and their application in the synthesis of linear arrays will be illustrated also with a set of "Hands on" software classes.

Dr. Andrej Rumiantsev

Director of RF Technologies of the Advanced Semiconductor Test DivisionMPI Corporation
Taiwan

Bio:

Andrej Rumiantsev received the Diploma-Engineer degree (with highest honors) in Telecommunication systems from the Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radio Electronics (BSUIR), Minsk, Belarus, and the Dr.-Ing. Degree (with summa cum laude) in Electrical Engineering from Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU) Cottbus, Germany, in 1994 and 2014, respectively.

He joint SUSS MicroTec Test Systems (from January 2010 Cascade Microtech) in 2001 were he held various engineering product management and marketing positions. He significantly contributed to the development of the RF wafer probe, the |Z| Probe, wafer-level calibration standards, calibration software and probe systems. From 2010 to 2013 he was Product Marketing Manager of Device Characterization for Modeling and Process Development at Cascade Microtech and responsible for Elite300 system product line. In March 2013, he joined Ulrich L. Rohde Chair for RF and Microwave Techniques at Brandenburg University of Technologies (BTU), Cottbus, Germany. Dr. Rumiantsev is currently with MPI Corporation, holding a position of Director of RF Technologies of the Advanced Semiconductor Test Division. His research interests include RF calibration and wafer-level measurement techniques for advanced semiconductor devices.

Dr. Rumiantsev is a member of the IEEE MTT-11 Microwave Measurements Committee and the ExCom member of Automatic RF Techniques Group (ARFTG). He is the past ExCom member and Chair of the Modeling and Simulation Sub-Committee of IEEE Bipolar/BiCMOS Circuits and Technology Meeting (BCTM), TPC member of BCICTS, past Technical Program Chair of ARFTG-92nd and ARFTG-93rd and the General Chair of ARFTG-94th. He holds multiple patents in the area of wafer-level RF calibration and measurements techniques. Dr. Rumiantsev received the ARFTG-71th Best Interactive Forum Paper Award. His doctoral thesis was awarded as “Best Dissertation of 2014 at Brandenburg University of Technologies”.

Title:

Recent Advances in mm-wave Characterization, Calibration and de-embedding techniques

Abstract:

Wafer-level S-parameter measurement at mm-wave and sub-mm wave frequencies plays a crucial role in the model development and IC design verification of advanced semiconductor technologies. Accurate calibration of the entire wafer-level measurement system to the RF probe tip end or to the intrinsic device terminals is a critical success factor for extracting trustable device model parameters and characterizing true performance of a RF IC. Challenges of obtaining accurate, reproducible and trustable results drastically increase with the frequency: methods and practices that have been working well, tend to fail or to yield results which are difficult to interpret. 

This work discusses specifics of S-parameter measurement and calibration techniques at the wafer-level. Special attention is paid to the similarities and differences between RF calibration and parasitic de-embedding methods and to get the best out of these two. This work also includes  practical examples of how to minimize the impact of calibration residual errors on the accuracy of measurement results.

Prof. Shlomo Shamai

Distinguished ProfessorTechnion - Israel Institute of Technology
Israel

Bio:

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Jeffrey H. Shapiro

Julius A. Stratton Professor of Electrical EngineeringMassachusetts Institute of Technology
USA

Bio:

Jeffrey H. Shapiro received the S.B., S.M., E.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970, respectively, all in electrical engineering. From 1970 until 1973 he was an Assistant Professor of Electrical Sciences and Applied Physics at Case Western Reserve University. Since 1973 he has been on the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is now the Julius A. Stratton Professor of Electrical Engineering. Professor Shapiro's research interests center on the application of communication theory to optical systems. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Optical Society, the Institute of Physics, and SPIE, and a Life Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

In 2008 he was co-recipient of the Quantum Electronics Award from the IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society, and he received the Quantum Communication Award for Theoretical Research from Tamagawa University.

Title:

The Quantum Illumination Story

Abstract:

Superposition and entanglement, the quintessential characteristics of quantum physics, have been shown to provide communication, computation, and sensing capabilities that go beyond what classical physics will permit. It is natural, therefore, to explore their application to radar, despite the fact that decoherence - caused by the loss and noise encountered in radar sensing - destroys these fragile quantum properties. This paper tells the story of "quantum illumination," an entanglement-based approach to quantum radar, from its inception to its current understanding. Remarkably, despite loss and noise that destroys its initial entanglement, quantum illumination does offer a target-detection performance improvement over a classical radar of the same transmitted power. A realistic assessment of the utility of that improvement, however, shows that its value is severely limited. Nevertheless, the fact that entanglement can be of value on an entanglement-breaking channel - the meta-lesson of the quantum illumination story - should spur continued research on quantum radar.

Prof. Hjalti H. Sigmarsson

School of Electrical and Computer EngineeringThe University of Oklahoma
USA

Bio:

Hjalti Sigmarsson (S’01, M’10, SM’18) received the Bachelor of Science in electrical and computer engineering degree from the University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland in 2003, and the Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, in 2005 and 2010, respectively.

He is currently with the School of Electrical & Computer Engineering and the Advanced Radar Research Center (ARRC) at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, where he is an associate professor. His current research is focused on reconfigurable RF and microwave hardware for agile communications, measurement, and radar systems. Furthermore, his research interests include spectral management schemes for cognitive radio architectures, advanced packaging utilizing heterogeneous integration techniques, and additive manufacturing of electromagnetic components.

Dr. Sigmarsson is a member of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (MTT-S), the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (AP-S), IEEE Electronics Packaging Society (EPS), Eta Kappa Nu, and the International Microelectronics and Packaging Society (IMAPS). He was the recipient of the Best Paper Award of the IMAPS 2008 41st International Symposium on Microelectronics. In 2015 he was awarded the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Young Investigator Program (YIP) to support his research on reconfigurable high-frequency components using phase-change materials. Dr. Sigmarsson was named the recipient of the Gerald Tuma Presidential Professorship in 2018 for meeting the highest standards of excellence in scholarship and teaching.

Title:

Integration of Filters into Phased Array Antenna Panels

Abstract:

With the ever-increasing bandwidth requirements of current and future wireless services, the radio-frequency spectral environment will continue to grow more crowded. In anticipation of this development, multifunctional radar systems that can perform multiple missions, such as air-traffic control and weather monitoring, have grown in popularity in recent years. Microwave filters are needed to protect the systems from nearby interference. In this presentation, methods for integrating microwave filters directly into the antenna array panels are presented. A comparison between using different filter implementations, such as miniaturized distributed elements, lumped elements, and quasi-lumped elements, is reported. The goal is to integrate low-loss filters without adding any volume to the array. Overall, these filters can be used to mitigate interference with minimal impact of systems sensitivity, and thus ensuring proper radar operation in the crowded electrical environments of the future.

Dr. Mark S. Spector

Program OfficerAdvanced Naval Platforms Division at the Office of Naval Research
USA

Bio:

Dr. Mark S. Spector is a Program Officer in the Advanced Naval Platforms Division at the Office of Naval Research where he manages programs in thermal science, metamaterials, and energy conversion. In addition, he sits on the Steering Committee of the Department of Defense Energy and Power Community of Interest and the NATO Applied Vehicle Technology Power and Propulsion Systems Technical Committee.  Previously, he worked as a Research Physicist in the Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering at the Naval Research Laboratory.  He received his Ph.D. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his A.B. in Physics and Applied Mathematics from University of California at Berkeley.

Title:

Thermal Challenges for Future Military Platforms

Abstract:

​Mr. Nino Srour

Chief for the Networked Sensing & Fusion BranchUS Army Research Laboratory
USA

Bio:

Mr. Nino Srour is the current Chief for the Networked Sensing & Fusion Branch at ARL, and is responsible for the basic, and applied research and development for Data and Information Fusion and Networked Sensing programs in the Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate (SEDD) at the US Army Research Laboratory. Mr. Srour has over 30 years of expertise in areas related to battlefield target detection, tracking, classification and identification. He currently supervises 11 engineers and has published numerous reports, patents and proceedings on the topic of acoustic target tracking, sensor fusion and Unattended Ground Sensors.  Mr. Srour has served as Acting Associate Director for Science and Technology within the SEDD, and as Acting Chief for the Image Processing Branch for the Signal & Image Processing Division for SEDD, each for a period of 1 year. He is currently the Chairman for The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) Panel on Integration and Interoperability and former Chair of the Military Sensing Symposium for Battlefield Acoustic and Seismic Sensing.  Mr. Srour is the recipient of multiple ARL Leadership and Partnering awards, the 2005 Federal Executive Board (FEB) Bronze award for Diversity, the US Army Greatest Invention of the Year Award for 2004 & 2006, the 1999 US Army Research and Development Achievement Award for Technical Excellence, the 2009 NATO Research Technology Organization (RTO) Significant Achievement Award, the 2012 Technical Cooperation Achievement Award and is a Military Sensing Symposium (MSS) Fellow. He graduated with an M.S. degree in Mechanical engineering from the University of Maryland (1989), and with a B.S. degree in Aerospace engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of New York (1983).

Title:

Novel Approaches to Expand Detection Coverage of Fixed Unattended Ground Sensor Systems

Abstract:

Over the last few years, the Networked Sensing & Fusion Branch at the Army Research Laboratory has conducted research to advance the technology of Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) systems to provide situational awareness in support of the US military. This research led to the implementation of new, multi-modal sensors, advanced novel communication networks, data fusion algorithms and a compilation of user feedback regarding desired UGS features. Some of these desired features can now provide: (i) an ability to accurately localize and track personnel or vehicles, (ii) communication links that are resilient and provide Line-of-Sight (LOS) and beyond LOS data exfiltration, (iii) standardized data output for interoperability to ease integration with other sensor systems, and (iv) low Size Weight and Power (SWaP) features for longevity in harsh battlefield environments.

The evaluation of such UGS systems has highlighted a gap in this technology associated with the limited detection range of fixed ground sensors. This briefing will address novel ideas to extend range coverage of fixed ground sensors in open and urban environments.

Prof. Almudena Suárez

ProfessorUniversity of Cantabria
Spain

Bio:

Almudena Suárez is a full professor at University of Cantabria (Spain) and head of the research group Microwave Engineering and Radiocommunication Systems. She is a Fellow member of the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, New Jersey, USA). She was also an IEEE Distinguished Microwave Lecturer during the period 2006-2008. She has published more than 80 papers in IEEE journals, with 57 in IEEE T-MTT. She has authored the book 'Analysis and design of autonomous microwave circuits' (IEEE-Wiley, 2009) and co-authored the book 'Stability Analysis of nonlinear microwave circuits' (Artech House, 2003). She is a member of the technical committees of IEEE International Microwave Symposium and European Microwave Week. She is a member of the Board of Directors of European Microwave Association. She has been the Editor in Chief of International Journal of Microwave and Wireless Technologies of Cambridge Journals. She was the coordinator of the Communications and Electronic Technology Area for the Spanish National Evaluation and Foresight Agency (ANEP) between 2009 and 2013.

Title:

Short Course:
Stability Analysis of Microwave Circuits

Talk:
Challenges in the Analysis of Innovative Oscillator-Based Circuits for Radar, RFID and Reconfigurable Systems

Abstract:

Short Course Abstract:

Instability is a fundamental problem in the design of microwave circuits, giving rise to an experimental behaviour qualitatively different from the expected one, which will degrade or fully disrupt the circuit performance. If the simulated solution is unstable, it will not be able to recover from the small perturbations that are always present in real life, so the solution measured for the same conditions will be different from the simulated one. Undesired behaviours include oscillations, frequency divisions, hysteresis and chaos. Their a posteriori correction is impossible in integrated technologies, whereas in hybrid technologies trial and error procedures turn out to be inefficient in most cases, since they are applied without an identification and understanding of the instability phenomenon causing malfunction. As a result, the problem will arise again in new prototypes, thus increasing the production cycles and the final cost.

The course will enable a good understanding of the stability concept and the causes of the most common types of instability phenomena, and will provide practical simulation tools for an efficient prediction of these phenomena at the design stage. The course will address the stability analysis in small- and large-signal regime. Different approaches will be presented, with emphasis on the Nyquist criterion and pole-zero identification. Qualitative changes in the circuit stability properties under variations of crucial parameters, such as input power or bias voltage, are predicted with a global stability analysis. A bifurcation is a qualitative change of stability of the circuit solution or in the number of steady-state solutions when the parameter is varied continuously. The bifurcations delimit the stable operation ranges of circuits that are not expected to oscillate, such as power amplifiers or frequency multipliers. On the other hand, they are essential in circuits of autonomous nature, such as free and injection-locked oscillators and frequency dividers, as they lead these circuits to the intended operation mode. In the course, the most common types of bifurcation will be presented and classified, so that the designer may indentify the bifurcation phenomena in measurement and simulation. It will present practical examples of instability and bifurcations in nonlinear circuits such as power amplifiers, frequency multipliers, frequency dividers and voltage controlled oscillators. The impact of instability on the circuit performance (for instance, in the measured spectrum or its response to parameter variations) will be shown, and systematic and efficient stabilization procedures will be presented.

Index of topics

  1. Types of steady-state solutions of nonlinear circuits.
  2. Fundamentals of harmonic-balance analysis.
    2.1 Comparison with time-domain simulations.
    2.2 Difficulties in the analysis of oscillatory solutions.
    2.3 Complementary techniques for the analysis of oscillations.
  3. Stability.
    3.1 Concept.
    3.2 Fundamentals of the stability analysis of constant and periodic solutions.
    3.3 Rollet stability analysis. Limitations.
  4. Stability analysis in harmonic balance.
    4.1 Characteristic system.
    4.2 Nyquist criterion.
    4.3 Pole-zero identification.
    4.4 Application to circuits with complex topologies.
  5. Global stability analysis.
    5.1 Concept of bifurcation.
    5.2 Types of bifurcations.
    5.3 Practical techniques for bifurcation detection.
    5.4 Examples:  power amplifiers, frequency multipliers, frequency dividers and voltage controlled oscillators.
  6. Stabilization methods. Application to power amplifiers.

 

Talk Abstract:

The talk will present recent advances in the analysis and design of compact and low consumption circuits for radar, RFID and reconfigurable systems. The new topologies take advantage of the capability of oscillator circuits to combine the inherent signal generation with specific functions, such a mixing or phase shifting. However, this function integration comes at the cost of an increase in the complexity of the circuit operation, which must simultaneously fulfill a number of mathematical conditions in a system of autonomous nature. The talk focuses on realistic and easy-to-use analysis methodologies for these novel circuits. In self-injection locked radar, the oscillator signal is transmitted to the moving target and reinjected into the oscillator with a phase modulation, induced by the target movement. In compact and low-cost RFID readers the oscillator signal is controlled with a ramp generator and transmitted through an antenna, and the variations in the oscillator load impedance, induced by the tag resonators, give rise to a modulation of the oscillator frequency. The talk will present a new analysis methodology, which makes use of an oscillator model extracted from harmonic-balance simulations and insightful analytical expressions for the description of the oscillator interaction with the environment. As another example, super-regenerative oscillators are able to replace costly amplifier chains in receivers by taking advantage of the initial exponential growth of the oscillation signal. Here they will be analyzed through the extraction of a linear time-variant transfer function in the envelope domain, from which their response to any arbitrarily modulated input signal is efficiently derived. Finally, switchless reconfigurable oscillators, of practical interest in modern multiband communication systems, will be considered.

 

 

Dr. Horst Theuss

Infineon Technologies AG Lead Principal Package & Assembly ConceptsInfineon
Germany

Bio:

Horst Theuss received his Ph.D degree in Physics from the University of Stuttgart/Germany in 1993. As a material scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Metal Research in Stuttgart he focused on magnetic properties of superconductors and amorphous metals. His scientific work was awarded the Otto-Hahn-Medal for young scientists by the Max Planck Society. 

Within a one-year scholarship at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, CA, Dr. Theuss evaluated magnetic properties of thin exchange-coupled multilayer structures. In 1996, this was followed by an engagement at Vacuumschmelze GmbH, Hanau/Germany as a product marketing manager for alloys with special magnetic properties.

He joined Infineon in 2000 and has worked on assembly and interconnect technologies since. Focus topics are packaging of discrete semiconductors, multi-chip systems and wafer level packaging. As a Lead Principal he is today responsible for predevelopments in the field of packaging for Sensors and MEMS.

Title:

Pushing the Borders of Fan Out Wafer Level Packaging

Abstract:

Fan Out Wafer Level Packaging (FOWLP) has originally been developed for high pin count applications and - due to its superior RF properties - has quickly conquered high frequency applications, e. g.  in the field of 77 GHz Automotive Radar transceivers.

The talk will review current limits of FOWLP and then present recent developments on how these challenges can possibly be addressed. A specific topic will be the adaption of the process flow to MEMS and sensors. Details of a respective process option will be presented for the case study of a MEMS microphone. A second section will touch approaches on further improvements of the RF capability of FOWLP systems – e. g. by specific routing concepts or integration of antennas into the package.

Eventually, these developments will contribute to extend the heterogeneous integration capability of the FOWLP platform. They also demonstrate the ongoing dissolution of the old-fashioned firm border in between Frontend (wafer fabs) and Backend (chip assembly).

Prof. Mei Song Tong

Head of Department of Electronic Science and TechnologyTongji University
China

Bio:

Mei Song Tong received the B.S. and M.S. Degrees from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China, respectively, and Ph.D. degree from Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA, all in electrical engineering. He is currently the Distinguished Professor and Head of Department of Electronic Science and Technology, and Vice Dean of College of Microelectronics, Tongji University, Shanghai, China. He has also held an adjunct professorship at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA, and an honorary professorship at the University of Hong Kong, China. He has published more than 400 papers in refereed journals and conference proceedings and co-authored six books or book chapters. His research interests include electromagnetic field theory, antenna theory and design, simulation and design of RF/microwave circuits and devices, interconnect and packaging analysis, inverse electromagnetic scattering for imaging, and computational electromagnetics.

Title:

Abstract:

Dr. Piergiorgio L. E. Uslenghi

Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Associate DeanUniversity of Illinois at Chicago
USA

Bio:

Piergiorgio L. E. Uslenghi received the Laurea degree in Electrical Engineering from the Politecnico di Torino, Italy in 1960 and the Ph.D. degree in Physics from the University of Michigan in 1967. He holds the positions of Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Associate Dean of Engineering in the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has published extensively on electromagnetism, microwaves, antennas, scattering, novel electronic materials, optics, and applied mathematics. He was President of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (2001), Chair of the United States National Committee of the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) (2006-08), Vice-President of URSI (2011-14; re-elected for 2017-20), Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation (1995-98) and of Electromagnetics (1983-89) and Founding Editor of the IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWPL). In November 2009, the IEEE Board of Directors instituted the “AWPL Piergiorgio L. E. Uslenghi Best Paper Award”, to be given annually by the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society to the author of the best letter published during the previous year in the IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters.

   Dr. Uslenghi is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi Honorary Societies, a member of USNC-URSI Commissions B, D, E and K, a Distinguished Alumnus of the Politecnico di Torino, a Fellow of the EMP and of URSI, a Life Fellow of IEEE, a recipient of the IEEE Third Millennium Medal and of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society Distinguished Achievement Award. He was inducted into the Accademia delle Scienze di Torino in 2003, and was named University of Illinois Scholar in 2006 and Distinguished Professor in 2009.

Title:

Abstract:

Dr. Jeffrey Walling

Principal EngineerQualcomm
USA

Bio:

Dr. Walling received the B.S. degree from the University of South Florida, Tampa, in 2000, and the M.S. and Ph. D. degrees from the University of Washington, Seattle, in 2005 and 2008, respectively. He is currently an associate professor in the ECE Department at University of Utah, where he has been since 2012. His group performs research on wireless transceivers and sensor circuits for high speed communications and the Internet-of-Things. He has authored >70 peer-reviewed and refereed journal and conference papers and holds four patents with six pending.
He is Head of RF Transceivers at MCCI, and is an Adjunct Professor at University of Utah. He serves on the program committee for IEEE RFIC and IEEE NEWCAS. He received the Outstanding Teaching Award at University of Utah in 2015, the HKN Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2012 at Rutgers University, the Best Paper Award at Mobicom 2012, the Yang Award for outstanding graduate research from the EE Department at University of Washington in 2008, an Intel Predoctoral Fellowship in 2007-2008, and the Analog Devices Outstanding Student Designer Award in 2006.

Title:

Abstract:

Dr. Hua Wang

DirectorGeorgia Tech Electronics and Micro-System (GEMS) lab
USA

Bio:

Hua Wang (M’05‒SM’15) is an associate professor at the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at Georgia Institute of Technology and the director of Georgia Tech Electronics and Micro-System (GEMS) lab. Prior to that, he worked at Intel Corporation and Skyworks Solutions on mm-Wave integrated circuits and RF front-end modules. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, in 2007 and 2009, respectively.

   Dr. Wang is interested in innovating mixed-signal, RF, and mm-Wave integrated circuits and hybrid systems for wireless communication, radar, imaging, and bioelectronics applications.

   Dr. Wang received the DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2018, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2015, the IEEE MTT-S Outstanding Young Engineer Award in 2017, the Georgia Tech Sigma Xi Young Faculty Award in 2016, the Georgia Tech ECE Outstanding Junior Faculty Member Award in 2015, and the Lockheed Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award in 2015. He held the Demetrius T. Paris Professorship from 2014 to 2018. His GEMS research group has won multiple academic awards and best paper awards at IEEE conferences, including the 2019 Marconi Society Paul Baran Young Scholar, the IEEE RFIC Best Student Paper Awards (1st Place in 2014, 2nd Place in 2016, and 2nd Place in 2018), the IEEE CICC Outstanding Student Paper Awards (2015, 2018, and 2019), the IEEE CICC Best Conference Paper Award (2017), the 2016 IEEE Microwave Magazine Best Paper Award, the IEEE SENSORS Best Live Demo Award (2nd Place in 2016), as well as many best paper award finalists.

   Dr. Wang is a Technical Program Committee (TPC) Member for IEEE ISSCC, RFIC, CICC, and BCICTS conferences. He is a Steering Committee Member for IEEE RFIC and CICC. He is a Distinguished Lecturer (DL) for the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society (SSCS) for the term of 2018-2019. He serves as the Chair of the Atlanta’s IEEE CAS/SSCS joint chapter that won the IEEE SSCS Outstanding Chapter Award in 2014.

Title:

Millimeter Wave Power Amplifiers - State of the Art and Future Technology Trends

Abstract:

Dr. Mark E. Weber

Senior Research PhysicistNOAA OAR National Severe Storms Laboratory Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Studies
University of Oklahoma
USA

Bio:

Dr. Mark E. Weber is a Senior Research Physicist at the NOAA OAR National Severe Storms Laboratory.  His principal assignment involves technology risk reduction, acquisition strategy development and advanced concept exploration for NOAA's Meteorological Phased Array Radar program.   In addition Dr. Weber is facilitating efforts at NSSL and the University of Oklahoma to enhance airspace access for small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS), thereby enabling their use for routine and effective in situ measurements of atmospheric parameters.

Prior to joining NSSL, Mark was Assistant Head of the Homeland Protection and Air Traffic Control Division at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory.  In this role, he was responsible for leadership of the Laboratory's Air Traffic Control mission area with emphasis on support to the FAA's Next Generation Air Transportation System initiative. The Laboratory's ATC activities include major programs in surveillance, weather, safety modeling, collision avoidance, automation and decision support.

Dr. Weber has also worked at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory and the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory.  He holds a BA degree in physics from Washington University in St. Louis and a PhD degree from Rice University's Space Physics and Astronomy Department. 

Title:

Meteorological Phased Array Radar Research at NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory

Abstract:

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has pioneered the development and application of high-performance meteorological radar for public weather warning and forecasting services. The current operational system, the dual-polarization WSR-88D weather surveillance radar, has led to significant capability enhancements, for example, increased accuracy and lead time for severe weather and flash flood warnings.

This paper describes research to determine whether the eventual replacement for the WSR-88D should exploit phased array radar (PAR) technology. Key severe weather warning service benefits for the rapid, adaptive scanning so enabled have been identified.  PAR may also facilitate observations of winds and humidity in precipitation-free volumes by using high average-power pulse transmissions and adaptively scheduled, long duration dwells.  Our research program is validating these operational benefits and maturing the associated data processing and numerical weather prediction (NWP) model assimilation techniques. In parallel, the engineering challenges associated with meteorological PAR are being addressed through hardware demonstration and data analysis. As an example, the Advanced Technology Demonstrator (ATD) – a 4 m diameter, S-band, dual polarization PAR - has recently been deployed at the National Severe Storms Laboratory.  In 2020-2022 data collection, analysis and demonstration using the ATD will determine whether PAR can meet NWS requirements for quality of observations, while increasing the overall temporal sampling rate and adaptively concentrating observations in volumes of high importance.  Two key determinations will be the effectiveness of PAR dual-polarization calibration techniques, and the efficacy of radar resource management techniques tailored to achieve the desired rapid scanning.

Mr. Marc K. Weinstein

Special CounselXsensus Intellectual Property LLP
USA

Bio:

Marc K. Weinstein has been an intellectual property attorney for over 20 years.  His practice focuses on post-grant proceedings, litigation, and IP counseling, but he also has significant experience with patent preparation and prosecution. Mr. Weinstein has handled all aspects of post-grant proceedings at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) including inter partes reviews, inter partes reexaminations, and ex parte reexaminations. He has represented clientsacross a variety of technological areas including mobile devices, wireless and network communications, GPS and navigation, imaging and displays, and computer software. In addition, he has worked on numerous patent disputes both at the U.S. District Court and before the International Trade Commission.He also has extensive experience with international intellectual property issues including living and working in Tokyo, Japan for over 10 years.  Mr. Weinstein graduated with a J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center and with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Pennsylvania State University.

Title:

Using intellectual property to protect innovations in a global marketplace

Abstract:

Any industry seeking success in the global marketplace must make skillful use of patents, trade secrets, and employee contracts to ensure protection of its technical know-how and innovation.  This talk offers insights and examples of how high-tech companies in Israel and elsewhere can realize this protection and maximize their business advantage.  The techniques include close attention to patent law in different countries, cross-licensing agreements, and effective use of legal remedies.  The speaker has extensive experience in international patent licensing and litigation.

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